What Guitar do you play?

What is the instrument of your choice? 🎸

I play a Paco Santiago Marin - XXX Anniversario! This guitar has been with me all my university years, and I have learned so much on this instrument! It has a lot of marks, so I intend to have my top redone within the following years, but I am still in love with the sound of this instrument! But it also has its shortcomings. It’s not very easy to play, guitars with a more modern approach require much less effort! 

     Feel free to share a picture of your beauty! 🌟

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  • 2001 Thomas Humphrey - Millennium - A great guitar but as of last month I had a horrendous accident. I had a steel string and it toppled over at speed and the machine head went through the top like a dart going into a dartboard.  Totally distraught.  Iife goes on

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    • John armato  yes, totally gutted. Picked this out from the luthiers studio.

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  • Hey everyone,

     

    So great to see so many beautiful guitars here. I grew up in my guitar years listening to Christopher Parkening. After hearing his recordings I HAD to have a Ramirez. I could never afford the nice ones though at 15-16 years old. I started off with a $100 Yamaha, then a Jasmine, then my first concert guitar, a G.V Rubio, and then off to a Greg Byers. While at school I finally had the chance to buy a Ramirez. I quickly sold the Byers and bought a 1976 Jose Ramirez 2A. Brazilian sides and back, cedar top. It has that quintessential Ramirez sound that I just love. It's super warm, and full, great for the Spanish rep. That 664 scale length is killer on the left hand though. I just adore making music with this guitar.  The iPhone pics don't do it justice. I'll take better photos of it soon and post them.  

    I love the first string on this guitar, especially the 5th fret A. This guitar will be headed off for a re-fret soon as these are the originals, and pretty beat up. I keep it in a flight case, humidified and away from heat. As you can see it needs a wipe down, but I'm posting this between students so I've been teaching all night on it. 

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  • This is a 2023 Steven Walter which is inspired by the late Thomas Humphrey who made the millennium design. The broad strokes are that Steve was taught about this design when they were friends. The guitar has amazing projection and ease of playability. I felt that this type of construction can have a tendency to be a bit too bright for me so he made it with a redwood top and Rosewood back and sides with a koa insert and this really warmed it up nicely without being too muddy. It is finished in a French polish. At this moment I play pieces such as villa Lobos prelude 3 and 5 as well as burgalesa and preludio de adios. These pieces work perfectly on this guitar. 100% my favorite and I own 4 other guitars from different builders, all good but this is next level. I would like to play one with a tornavoz too. So many desires so little time…

     

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    • Jose
    • Jose.1
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    [email protected]

    I am an old beginner and own 4 guitars, but the one I am playing right now is the modern version of the La Cañada, Antonio de Torres - Jellinghaus replica, as you might know, this is the first guitar Fco. Tárrega purchased from Antonio de Torres in 1864, and played for 40 years.  The modern version replica is true in its dimensions and all construction details, but differs in the woods used.  The B&S are made of Granadillo, the top is German Spruce cut during a crescent moon.  They made even tuners with the brand name used by de Torres at that time.  The genius of Antonio de Torres is really manifested in this guitar.  I realize the wood difference means there are significant difference in sound quality, but this small body guitar sounds so good, and is easier to play than any of my other guitars.  Opening the case of the guitar is a pleasant experience with the aroma of the Granadillo inundating my small office.  The two giants associated to this guitar makes for a wonderful motivation in trying to improve myself.

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      • David
      • David.39
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Jose i am interested in a 630mm scale Jellinghaus, mainly because it’s a smaller body and is readily available. Would you recommend the Jellinghaus make? I’m looking at a model 17a 

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    • David I have the La Cañada torres 17a which is 640 scale, it is basically a jellinghaus. Very high quality purchased from guitar salon, you would be very happy with one of these

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  • I was a rock guitarist since the early 70s. Then went into finger style acoustic guitar (Leo Kottke) in the 80s and then into progressive rock style music in the 90s. 

    Five years ago, I decided to take lessons for classical guitar.

    I found a wonderful instructor, Jaclyn Jones, and started learning from her. I was using a mid-level Cordoba guitar and when I heard my guitar teachers guitar, I asked her what it was. She told me it was made by a Luthier by the name of Alan Chapman in Amherst, Massachusetts. I contacted them and Alan and his protégé Gef Fisher built me a guitar with East Indian Rosewood body, Engelmann spruce top, mahogany neck. It sounded so much better than my old guitar. 

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    • Cliff Main
    • Cliff_Main
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I am very fortunate to be playing a Yulong Guo Chamber Concert Signing Dragon Classical guitar. Indian Rosewood back and sides, Cedar Cedar double-top. The back is 2 layers of Indian Rosewood, arched (like violin style) and brace-less back. The arch supports the guitar nicely. It also has an armrest, 12 hole tie block and very nice tuners (well, nice for what I was used to). Besides the incredible look of the guitar, it is the nicest playing and sounding guitar I have ever had the fortune to hold and play. It is above my stature, and makes (even me) sound great! I went one day in the last six months without playing it and I felt like I did something bad! Due to an illness, playing guitar has replaced almost all of my other hobbies that I've had over the years. I don't have to be good at it to enjoy a great guitar. I like the tone, the richness of the sound, the overall volume (and wow can it be loud if you want it to!!!). It is also the first guitar I ever played with a sound port. All the bells and whistles in a somewhat affordable guitar. And wow do some of you have unbelievable guitars in your collection! I'm so jealous :)

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  • I play a 1969 Ramirez 1A, 664 mm scale, that I bought at the Ramirez shop in Madrid in 1969.  It was built by the legendary luthier, MT (Mariano Tezanos Castro) who built most of the Ramirez guitars that Segovia played. The cedar top and Indian rosewood back and sides had been aged for 50 years before being shaped into my guitar.  I love the warm sound.  It’s especially nice for Albeniz and Granados.  I know the extra length makes it more difficult for the left hand, but I’ve never played an instrument that I love more.

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  • I play on a Martin 00–18 G guitar, made in 1946. You will notice that the spruce front has a few more pieces than normal because most of the spruce had been used for aircraft wings during World War II. Little was available apparently. In spite of the multiple pieces of spruce, this guitar has good sustain and a lovely tone. It has some cracked finish on the back, and a few dings and scratches, but looks fine.

     

    I bought it rather inexpensive 20 years ago as one of the bracings was loose and the top appeared a bit wavy. It was a low-cost, easy fix for the Luthier to reglue the bracing. The top is perfect now. He also set it up and it’s retained a great set up ever since. 

     

    I think this is an appropriate guitar for my level – about 5-6, intermediate, or so on the tonebase scale. I would like to get a better guitar eventually as I think the volume and sustain could be better. I’ve heard good ones some but they were expensive. I think I’ll have to spend a lot, probably thousands to get something that is better.  I have no issue with a tonal characteristics of this instrument – it has a nice warm, balanced sound across the fretboard and projects reasonably well. The frets are well W.r.t. intonation.

     

    The strings are Pro-Arte medium classical with a D’Addario carbon G, hi tension. This flattened the response nicely-the G was a bit duller with the medium set alone.

     

    Finally, when I upgrade, what guitars do you recommend? I’d love to hear from you.

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    • Joris Van Daele Interesting, as I'm in a similar position.  I play a Martin 00-16C from 1964.  It's a bit more beaten-up than your older guitar.  Bought it 20 or 25 years ago from the late lamented Mandolin Brothers in Staten Island.  Small but sweet voice.  I too am looking to upgrade, but not sure what direction to go.  The main question is to get a good factory-made guitar or go to a luthier.  My price point is about $3,000--which would get me a better factory guitar or (if I'm lucky) a good used handmade guitar.  I'd be willing to go higher, if I thought the benefit would be worth it.  I'm not a dilettante, and I'm not a collector.  The instrument would be to play.  Another student of my teacher was going to sell an Alhambra Linea Professional that sounded wonderful in her hands, but she ultimately decided it was too wonderful to part with.  So that's the discussion I'm having with myself. Another guitar buddy may be willing to part with one of his Kohnos (if he brings it back from Europe).
      So, besides trying a lot of guitars out, what helped your selection process?

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    • Steven Bornfeld 

      I just bought a Saez model 1963/now a model PS4. It’s a hand made shop guitar, cedar topped, lattice braced and solid pau ferro sides and back, and an ebony Fingerboard. It’s very nice and a great compliment to my 00-18G. i bought it for $1500 (CAD, about $1200 USD) second hand. 
       

    • Joris Van Daele From what I can tell, this looks like the general territory I am looking for.  Can't quickly locate any dealers in the U.S. though.  The couple I see online have quite a range in price; Reverb has one for $2600:
      https://reverb.com/item/53609178-prudencio-saez-4-ps-1963-classical-guitar
      ...while Amazon Germany has a similar model number instrument (but fan bracing) for a doubtful 579 Euros (I'm guessing at that price it's a very different guitar):
      https://www.amazon.de/-/en/Prudencio-Saez-Classical-Guitar-PS-4A-S/dp/B01F21CJFK/ref=sr_1_1?crid=J0IE5YP4FHA6&keywords=Prudencio+Saez+Classical+Guitar&qid=1704246476&s=musical-instruments&sprefix=prudencio+saez+classical+guitar+%2Cmi%2C155&sr=1-1

      In any case I'd definitely be interested in trying these out--thanks!

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    • Steven Bornfeld That German guitar is very different. I tried a number of $2500-$4,000 (CAD) guitars before buying the Saez. I thought the Saez was just as nice as the best of these. I found that in this price range, they’re all set up very well, play well, and are all pretty good. But the Saez had really good projection and sustain. The tone was even, and some of these expensive ones had weak spots, like poor bass or lack of brilliance in the high notes. One down side is that I discovered after buying that the construction uses a “Spanish heel”, rather than the usual dovetail for attaching the neck. This makes future neck resets impossible. You have to plane down the fretboard if the neck moves and the action goes high…

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    • Jose
    • Jose.1
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    David:

    I apologize, did not see your question till now.  I am more familiar with La Cañada Jellinghaus, but believe he is a serious luthier.  My understanding is that in all these replicas he develops the prototype in Germany, then the actual production is made in a small shop in China.  The quality of construction that I see in this guitar is just excellent.  I even took a boroscope camera and look inside, is just extremely precise and clean construction, you do not see the smallest amount of glue or other sign of disregard for quality.  I think he is very knowledgeable and thorough.  It is not one of kind type of construction, but the quality is at that level.  I bought mine through the Grand Salon de la Guitare in Montreal.  They have the Jellinhaus replicas, and you might get a better price with the exchange.   You can get them to play the guitar for you, etc.  They have a website.  If I can be of further service, please let me know.  Good luck to you.  José

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      • David
      • David.39
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Jose Thank you Jose. That is the shop that I have contacted. Glad to hear that you have had such a good experience with Jellinghaus. It is difficult to get smaller scale instruments locally, so I appreciate your comments on the quality of build since I can't see one in a shop here.

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      • Jose
      • Jose.1
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David 

      One more thing to realize is that on this guitar the spacing of the frets is almost the same as in a 650mm guitar.  I have another 630mm guitar and the frets spacing is proportional, meaning they get smaller and smaller as you move towards the bridge.  I find that uncomfortable.  On this guitar  (640 mm) the lower scale is achieved by the smaller body, so you still have to stretch your fingers, but I find it comfortable.  Also with the Montreal shop, you will not pay taxes because of the USMCA agreement, so the savings are significant.  Enjoy the guitar.  José

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  • I recently purchased a 2017 Darren Hippner, Hauser model. The instrument is based on the 1939 design and has a 48-mm nut. For an older player, having a slightly narrower fingerboard makes it a bit easier to play. The body is slightly smaller and with a bit less depth than many modern guitars, the instrument is very comfortable to play.  It is also the first spruce top instrument I have ever owned, and find the tone very well suited to music of the 19th and 20th century.  I have never played the music of Tarrega, Coste and Mertz as well as I do now.   I suspect the instrument has contributed to my improvements over the last few months. Interestingly, I still feel like I am getting to know the instrument.  

    • Richard M Levy  Not sure the images uploaded properly

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    • Kevin
    • Kevin.10
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I play a Cordoba C12 with hopes of updating to a luthier made guitar. But this really is a wonderful instrument with great sustain and overtones. This is my baby.

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    • Kevin those are nice, I’ve played them several times. I would keep it even if you do have something made.

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    • Johannes
    • Johannes.2
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I play a 2023 Casimiro Lozano double top. It has a spruce top and Indian rosewood on back and sides. 

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