Question about Guitar Support Systems

I have always held the guitar in the traditional position on my left leg with the use of a footstool.  Many guitarists these days use a guitar support system to hold the guitar (and now your feet are flat on the ground).  What product would you recommend?  I want the system to be easy to use, unobtrusive, stable, and safe for my guitar.  Those issues are more important than price.  Also, will I have to adjust my technique due to a possible different angle of attack?  Do support systems ever damage the finish on your guitar?   Thanks in advance for any advice.

4replies Oldest first
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Active threads
  • Popular
  • Hi  Stan ! I also use a footstool, however, I have played around with all kinds of different support systems in the past.

    Let's answer your questions one by one:

    • No, you should not need to adjust your technique too much. While the angle of the guitar might initially feel somewhat different when you first attach your new support, you will notice over a few days of usage that you can get it to match the previous angle of your guitar quite closely - assuming the support is good.
    • Yes, it is possible for support systems to damage the finish on your guitar. If you have the kind that needs to be put on and taken off for every use, you are likely to get some marks from them over time. There are a few options that should not leave any marks however: the cushion does not attach to your guitar with suction cups, for example. The GuitarLift does attach with suction cups, however, they connect on the back of the instrument, which is easier to fix.

    Hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

    Like
  • 80's Shredder here, having come back to classical guitar after a 20+ year absence, I have some strong opinions on this. Firstly I despise, and always have the foot stool. I never liked the confinement of being tied down in that way. Keep in mind, as an 80's shredder, I never liked being on a cord either, I always used wireless, again not being confined. Years ago I used the original A-Frame device. What I didn't know at the time was that the concert classical I owned (Randy Angella) was a French polish guitar and suction cups don't play nice with French polish. I was constantly putting them back on and even created a crack in the side of my guitar trying to push the suction cup to remain secure. 

     

    I've purchased another Angella concert classical and I'm using the Sageworks device. I do like it, but like the A-Frame if I move just right, the magnets disengage and, OOOPS, I'm fumbling around. I am seriously considering the Scott Tennant NO support method but I'm not sure that's for me either. 

     

    Honestly in terms of stability, I think the foot stool is the best, but in terms of comfort for me, it fails the test. I live by the adage "there ain't no such thing as a free lunch" and know that there is a tradeoff. Personally, and this is for myself only, I'll sacrifice stability for comfort. For me, I have to be comfortable to play well. 

    Like 1
  • I  absolutely love my Sageworks Umbra. I wish they existed back when I started as a kid. I find it is so so much more comfortable an the body and helps eliminate any twist. I never felt like I had to adjust myself at all with it. It just gladly natural. I have experimented with positioning of the magnets and I honestly only use a half strip of tape so they are easier to remove if I want to change it drastically. It took me a while to find the best position for me because I have a dodgy eft shoulder. I took my guitar in to my physical therapist and we found what is kind of an optimal positioning for me. I leave it on most the time as I hang my guitar but taking it on and off is NO problem. While it’s a strong strong hold I can also put it on and remove it softly, no damage at all to my finish and I can’t see it happening. 

    Like 1
  • Yes to Sageworks!  I have them on all my classical guitars.

    Like 1
Like Follow
  • 3 wk agoLast active
  • 4Replies
  • 87Views
  • 5 Following