Bokyung Byun - Ask me Anything about Guitar Technique!

Welcoming Bokyung Byun to answer YOUR questions right here in the community!  Being the WINNER of the 2021 GFA  Competition AND the first female winner of the prestigious JoAnn Falletta International Guitar Concerto Competition, we are excited to have her right here in our community giving you her insights on all things on strings! 

Check out some of here Productions right here! 

How to Participate

  • Ask your questions right here until August 5th!
  • Bokyung will answer questions from August 8th-12th!
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  • Thank you so much, Bokyung, for taking our questions! I have a few questions. Rather than trying to explain them in words, I just made a quick video to show you what I'm asking. I'm sorry it is so long!

    Like 3
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view
      Eric Phillips
      
      Like 6
    • Bo Byun Thank you so much, Bo! Everything you said is very insightful and makes complete sense to me. I really appreciate you taking the time to give such a thoughtful response.

      Like 2
  • If there is only 5-10 minute for practising technique each day, which exercise would you recommend?  

     

    Thank you answering!

    Like 1
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Steven Hi Steven! I usually work on techniques that I need to improve on. For example, if I'm learning a piece that has a lot of pull-off slurs, I would use about 10 minutes before I start practicing the piece to work on slur exercises. Therefore, the technique warm up always changes for me depending on the pieces I'm working on. My favorite exercises in general are the daily warm up routine from Scott Tennant's Pumping Nylon. I hope this helps! 😄

      Like 2
    • Ron
    • Ron
    • 1 yr ago
    • Reported - view

    For older guitarists what can we do to solidify consistency in our playing in attempting to move from the intermediate to more advanced stages of execution. Ron Puddu

    Like 1
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Ron 

      Like 5
    • Daniel
    • Daniel.15
    • 1 yr ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi Bokyung, thank you for this wonderful opportunity. I'm new here, so there may have been a discussion of this question in the past, but since you're here I thought I'd ask. I first learned guitar many years ago and have recenlty returned to it after a long time away. I was taught to hold my right hand Segovia-style, with a high wrist on my right hand and fingers basically perpendicular to the strings. I recently worked with a teacher who strongly encouraged me to hold my wrist much straighter. Doing that really feels like starting over on the instrument. So my question: is it worth the trouble to relearn right-hand technique?

    Like
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Daniel Hi Daniel! It's always such a pain when we have to change a playing position, but I think in this case it will be totally worth it to make the switch. The reason why people are staying away from the Segovia-style right hand position these days is because it can cause pain in the right hand. The idea is to keep the wrist at a neutral position (straight) so that there wouldn't be any tension built up. Whenever I have to make a dramatic change like this, I start with a completely new piece. With a new piece, you won't have any old habits built up from previous practices, so you just have to make sure to watch out for the right hand position at all times. Before you know it, by the time you are done with the piece, the new position will have become your second nature! I hope this helps! ☺️

      Like 5
      • Daniel
      • Daniel.15
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Bo Byun Thanks! That gives me encouragement and some ideas for how to get there. Will try.

      Like
  • Hello Bokyung Thank you for this forum

    1. I would like to know which Methods for classical guitar do you suggest me to study in a progressive way. 

    2. Which is the brand of your guitar? 

    3. When you were born? 

     

    Thank you very much

    Like
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      CARLOS GUTIERREZ Hi Carlos! Would you mind sharing what kind of pieces you are currently working on so that I can give you a better recommendation on the method books? My guitar is made by Dieter Mueller in 2019, and I was born in 1994. 😄

      Like 1
  • Hello Bokyung my question Is, exist methods for instruments similar like guitar for example tiple or requinto, for practice the tecnique of the left hand AND right hand. Special for the aplatillado. 

    Like
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Oscar Leonardo Molina Sierra Hi Oscar! I really wish I could give you a great answer to this, but unfortunately, I don't have a lot of experience on plucked instruments with courses. I'm going to summon martin here so that he can bring an early music expert for this Q&A in the future! 😊

      Like
    • Barney
    • Barney
    • 1 yr ago
    • Reported - view

    Please ask Bo to describe:

    How to play fast Scales legato, at same volume, with minimal noise;  also whether she does them with Rest Stroke or Free stroke.

    Best way to practice it as part of daily routine.

    Thanks.

    Like
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Barney 

      Like 6
      • Barney
      • Barney
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Bo Byun Thanks very much for your reply about scales.  One point you did not respond to was keeping noise to a minimum while playing ascending or descending fast scales.  How do you eliminate noise from the string changes, and form unwanted resonances while executing the runs?  Do you make your right hand thumb follow to mute the previous string, for example, on ascending scales? and what about muting on the descending ones when the passage is very fast?

      Like
      • Barney
      • Barney
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Bo Byun Sorry Bo. I did not see your response to this part of my questions:

      Best way to practice Scales it as part of daily warmup or technique routine.  Thanks again!

      Best regards, Barney

      Like
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Barney I think it depends. Usually a scale passage is fast enough that the resonance doesn't bother me. It all depends on the context but one way to eliminate resonance is to use rest stroke for scales as it will naturally mute the previous strings. Best way to practice scales is as I mentioned in the video. Take out the scale passage and turn it into an exercise that you can practice part of your warm up.

      Like
      • Barney
      • Barney
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Bo Byun Thanks again, Bo!  I really appreciate and value your advice!

      Like
  • Unable to ask so ask question on YoneBase site to Bokyung Byun.  Having difficulty with sore left hand fingertips.  Not pressing too hard and have light guage strings.  Interfering to the point of no return.  Played guitar professionally many year ago albeit not classical.  Interest in classical was result of Wes Montgomery indicating “If you learn classical, you can play any genre.”  At this point, the physical pain is not tolerable.  Started learning classical in 2030, but teacher failed to review lessons and provided no technique instruction. Friend recommended ToneBase.  Rhett (female)

    Like
      • Bo Byun
      • Bo_Byun
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      rhettcollier Hi there! This happens to me from time to time. Although my pain doesn't usually last for any longer than 10 days, I was very worried that the pain kept on reoccurring so I went to see a doctor. It turned out it was a nerve-related pain. I was told to take a lot of water and do stretching exercises. Here is an exercise that I personally like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1Qr3m_Qk-g&list=WL&index=7&ab_channel=%EB%8B%A5%ED%84%B0%EC%A7%80%EB%85%B8%EC%9D%98%EB%B3%91%EC%9B%90%ED%83%88%EC%B6%9Cwith%EA%B8%B0%EB%8A%A5%EC%9D%98%ED%95%99 (it's in Korean btw, but you can follow his motions. The exercise starts at 2:32). I hope this helps!

      Like 2
    • Bo Byun 

       

      THANK YOU SO MUCH!  FIRST, I WILL increase my water intake (does a body good) and focus more of my stretching exercises in the hands and arm areas.  And thanks for the heads-up on the Video.  I will definitely view the video.   The link works!

       

      I've just come too far in playing guitar to allow this to prevent me from  continuing.  AGAIN THANKS SO MUCH!

       

      Rhett

      Like 1
  • Started classical in 2020.  Typo in prior msg.

    Like
  • What practice technique would you suggest for successfully playing with flow (legato) chords that are to be played up and down the fretboard is pieces such as Carcassi Etude No. 1 Op 60 - measures 29-37. I have challenges with correctly planting guide fingers and then applying remaining notes in a manner that stays in tempo and maintains tone. Thank you.

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