Streamlined guide to daily guitar regimen (without lessons in how to read music)

Yesterday I watched a ToneBase Piano workshop on Hanon's exercises as a "complete" one-stop technique regimen resource for pianists at intro to advanced level. I have many technique books and know there are Level 1 and 2 intro to Guitar workbooks on ToneBase Guitar. For someone already well-versed in how to read music (at the level of being able to play piano, violin, etc.),  what on ToneBase would you recommend for a similar one-book/one-workshop  for RH and LH technique? I own Pumping Nylon, The Path to Virtuosity, Berg's Mastering Guitar Technique, The Bible of Classical Guitar Technique by K盲pple, Yates's Classical Guitar Technique from Foundation to Virtuosity, and the classics by Sor, Guiliani, Carcassi, among other materials. It is all a bit bewildering, and many of the "intro to guitar" book mix technique with learning how to read music. I just want help from ToneBase on how to navigate technical books/materials on ToneBase to eliminate the basic musicianship from actually learning the specifics of Guitar Playing. Any guide for the musically literate, but newer to Guitar in terms of a simple daily guide to progressing through technique on the RH and LH will be very helpful.

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    • Stephen
    • Stephen.9
    • 9 mths ago
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    I agree!

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    • ken
    • ken
    • 9 mths ago
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    I would highly recommend The Emilio Pujol Exercises.
    For Left and Right hand synchronization.
    Rene . . . I can't spell his name but he is on TB. 
    Look up Pujol in lessons.

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      • David
      • David.39
      • 9 mths ago
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      ken Pujol materials are more difficult to find, but I will add to my collection and look into those since there is a ToneBase series of lessons to accompany them. The Synchronization of RH and LH is a challenge I am working on, so I greatly appreciate the recommendation.

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    • David
    • David.39
    • 9 mths ago
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    Great. Thank you very much. Looking up Pujol now.

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    • Jack Stewart
    • Retired
    • Jack_Stewart
    • 9 mths ago
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    Tonebase just started a forum discussion group on Carlevaro's School of Guitar. I have not used it (or even seen it) but I know many people find it pretty impressive. Tonebase has quite a bit of lessons on various technical aspects of playing, though that is not a single book format.

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  • I think the Yates series (vol I & II) does precisely that. He doesn鈥檛 teach you how to read music but instead has the book divided into two parts: RH & LH. Each section within each half can be pursued on its own; that is, you learn both hand techniques separately in a graduated progression. The Kappel book also spends no time on learning to read music but instead goes right into technique. Or it may be that I didn鈥檛 understand what those books lacked from your perspective.

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      • David
      • David.39
      • 9 mths ago
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      Stephen Darrell Oliver Thank you for the reply. Kappel and Yates look like great resources, and I was hoping for just such feedback on them from more experienced guitarists. Both seem to contain so much great material. Your description helps me think about delving into the Yates (or Kappel) to supplement the technique courses and materials offered here on ToneBase. 

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    • David great! That said, I would love to see a series of discussions from Dr. Yates or Mr. Kappel on their manuals. 

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  • Yes, I need to create something like this too. Given that I'm a beginner and only have about 30-45 minutes a day, having something that covers the basics and let's be grow without being overwhelming would be good.

     

    To add to David's list above, I also have this, Free Classical Guitar Method Book (PDF) | This is Classical Guitar, which is what I started with before I discovered ToneBase. Now I'm bouncing between this, a few pages in Pumping Nylon, and the TB beginning course. Lots to do (but I am having fun).

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    • Henrique
    • Henrique
    • 8 mths ago
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    David   I don't mean to be the bearer of bad news but I don't think there is a "complete one-stop technique regimen". You have quite a collection already. Perhaps you can use what you have and just organize your technical study based on the time you have.

    For someone like Erik Svenson , for example, that only has 30-45 minutes a day, a very long technique section would not be possible. When I have little time, I do the Daily Warm Up from Pumping Nylon. It's a very good introductory technique section and it's very well organized. If you get bored with it, you can just replace some exercises for similar ones from your already extensive library. As long as you keep the theme of the exercise, it should be fine. For example, you could replace the #8 from the Daily Warm Up with "the Spider" (p.22).

    It is so easy to get access to material that we tend to get lost in it. 

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      • David
      • David.39
      • 8 mths ago
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      Henrique Thank you for the useful perspective. I am arriving at the same conclusion and thank you for sharing your expertise on this matter. I have just received guidance through a two-week intensive here on ToneBase in designing a shorter warmup that covers some essential technique. That along with elements from the Pumping Nylon warmup you mentioned seems like a manageable amount of material from which to draw on, and also allows for more time playing music. So true about getting lost in all the available material!

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