Week 1: Going North! 🧭

Welcome to the Main Thread for the first week of the Landslög Challenge

Share your progress updates here and help each other out by commenting on other member's submissions!


↓ Happy Sharing! ↓

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  • I felt pretty good about this one, and a little less nerves today. I think going through Gulli's course on the piece really helped. I tried taking my time and slowing down with it more in comparison to the last one. Much more enjoyable of an experience.

    I do have a question for both II. and III. There's a notation saying subito under the dynamic marking on bar 18 in no. II. and on bar 4 in no III. I googled that it means immediately or suddenly. First off I'm not sure exactly how that's supposed to sound and secondly is it connected to the dynamic marking or is it meant for the measure bellow it?

    I gladly welcome any critiques.

    I'm going to get started on no. III and see how that goes.

    Like 6
    • Austin Flemming Bravo Austin, nicely done and it's great to see you enjoying and playing! As for the subito on bar 18 it's for the «mp» under the bass voice starting with A, to me it's more about the intention in relation to the dynamic in the current context.

      Like 2
    • Austin Flemming Very nice Austin. With those long gaps between chords, you really have to nail those chord shapes and you did a really good job with that. It's great when you can watch these videos and enjoy the music. Congrats.

      Like 1
    • Steve Price Blaise Laflamme Steve Pederson  Andre Bernier

      I very much appreciate the feedback. I'm feeling good about continuing to post my progress through this! Thank you for the kind words!

      Like
    • Austin Flemming hi Austin, I just now came back to the forum to follow all these beautiful submissions over the last week. Yours was a nice discovery. Your playing is really good. I feel your long chords are very smooth (it looks like you count them in 2) ,  and the dynamical development (the flow of going up in volume and back to p) sounds so natural and beautiful. 

      Like 1
    • joosje thank you so much!

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      • Moyses Lopes
      • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
      • Moses
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Austin Flemming I agree with Blaise Laflamme as for the subito. You has a dynamic ramp in the measure 17 going to a piano, and the mp for the first note of the measure 18 (an A) you have to do without a ramp, just increase the dynamic exactly in this note. The 'subitos' are usual mainly in the romantic period of music, I guess that Gulli used this resource to well mark the changes between these sessions. From measure 1 to 17 you has blocks of chords, and in the 18 you has the movement with the arpegio. With the mp subito you can mark these transition to emphasize her. Thank you for sharing, you played beautiful!

      Like 1
    • David
    • David.39
    • 1 yr ago
    • Reported - view

    Does anyone have suggestions on how to practice the first part so that one chord connects seamlessly to the next? I struggle to rearrange my left hand quickly enough to not have a noticeable gap in the sound.

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      • David Krupka
      • Amateur guitarist/lutenist
      • David_Krupka
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Since the chords are played as arpeggios, you don't need to have all your fretting-hand fingers in place when a new chord begins. (Fingers can be placed one at a time.) In some cases, you can place a finger on the fingerboard before it is needed. This often makes chord shifts much easier. As an example, towards the end of measure two, you can place your index finger on the second fret of the fifth string, just behind the third finger, which is still at this point needed at the third fret. Then, at the start of measure three, all you need to do is lift the third finger, and the 'B' in the bass is ready to be played. As this note is being sounded, the pinky is brought to the fourth fret of the fourth string for the F#. (This note could also be played using the third finger - that would be a little more difficult, but might make sense when one considers what comes in the following measure. Note that what works best for one player might not be ideal for everyone!) There's not a lot of time for this, but the point is it doesn't need to be instantaneous. If this 'just-in-time' approach to fingering is new to you, I would suggest practicing it very slowly at first, so you really gain control over the movement of the individual fingers. I hope this is clear - it's one of those things that is easier to demonstrate than describe!

      Like 1
      • David
      • David.39
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      David Krupka Thank you for the very helpful consideration on Langslag I finger preparation. Linking finger movements from one arrangement of the fingers to the next in the approach you describe is something I am going to concentrate on now.

      Like 1
  • Landslag I is the first piece I learned when I became a tb member , it’s a beautiful composition and very fun to play. I started the first three last year, I am working in #IV at the moment. 

    Like 3
    • Carlos Calderon Very nice Carlos. Thanks for sharing. I really like his piece.

      Like
    • Carlos Calderon well done Carlos, waiting to hear #4!

      Like 1
      • Steve Pederson
      • The Journey is My Destination!
      • Steve_Pederson
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Carlos Calderon Great job Carlos! I like watching you play it. It looks like you're really getting into it and enjoying it! 

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    • Carlos Calderon very nice. your playing is very natural and relaxing. 

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    • Steve Pederson thanks Steve!

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    • joosje appreciate it!

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  • Greetings all. This is one of my favorites from the set. It's super sparse which makes it hard to play cleanly, for me anyways. I need more notes to help cover the extraneous noise from my bad technique, lol. I ended up messing with the fingerings quite a bit to help me get a better grip on the phrases. I'm playing with a new microphone to hopefully get a little better sound as well.

    Like 5
    • Steve Price  Well done Steve, This sounds very good

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    • Steve Price you're doing good Steve, and you're right about slow pieces they bring up other kind of difficulties. Which microphone did you use for the take?

      Like 1
    • Blaise Laflamme Thanks Blaise. I've been playing around with a Yeti X USB mic that I think I'll like once I figure it out out. I only ever record things for lessons and I wanted to keep a very simple workflow so I think it will work out. 

      Like 1
    • Andre Bernier Thanks, Andre. I appreciate it.

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    • Steve Price agree, always best to use the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid) as long as you don't need something more complex. 👍

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      • Steve Pederson
      • The Journey is My Destination!
      • Steve_Pederson
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Steve Price Very nice work Steve! Sounded wonderful! 

      Like 1
    • Steve Price beautiful, Steve.  You are right: the slower and scarcer the music the more intense and important every gesture . Well done

      Like
  • For those who are looking at #11 there is a mistake on bar 20 which should be an open G instead of an open B for the last note of the 1st block. Doing an open B would somehow break the right hand pattern used everywhere in the piece and make it harder to do at the right speed. I also validated by watching Gulli performance of that bar and he's doing an open G.

    Good luck!

    Like 5
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