Tablature

I am so happy to see tablature included with Kai's new Flamenco course, thanks! I love tonebase but I don't read music (yet) so tablature is much appreciated.

Perhaps an upcoming course on reading music would be nice.

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  • Rodney, that sounds like a great idea! We also had our guest Brandon Acker talk about tablature in his recent live stream on early music (<- click to watch) - did you know tablature is actually older than standard notation, in the guitar family of instruments at least?

    Anyway, glad to hear you're having fun with Kai's course!

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  • I did not know that! Good info, thanks.

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  • I can't read music either, I might make an effort to learn one day but now my brain groans with agony at the prospect, tabs is straight forward. If I can't find tabs for a piece I can get them made using the Fiverr website.

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      • Rodney
      • Rodney
      • 7 mths ago
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      • Reported - view

      nathan Thanks for the tip!

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      • MirceaTeam
      • Head of Community / Live
      • Mircea
      • 6 mths ago
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      nathan and Rodney: hi guys! You might be aware of this already, but just in case you are not, we just held a 5-week "reading music course" on tonebase Live, featuring 5 weekly livestreams (~10 hours of video) and weekly assignments.

      Although the course is technically over (meaning there will be no further livestreams on the topic at this time), you can still submit assignments in the dedicated forums (<- click). And if you do, I will still give you advice and pointers on everything, including pitch, rhythm, fingerings, and more.

      Here is a link to the forum threads:

      Here is a link to the livestreams for:

      Hope this is useful to you!

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  • Thank you Mircea!

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    • Rodney Yes the reading music livestream was very helpful.  It covered a lot of ground reinforcing what I knew, and also helping to bridge gaps in my knowledge.   I'm a poor reader but a TAB monster!

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  • Kai is great.  He has inspired me to learn the Flamenco style and it is has become a

    regular fixture in my practice.  

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  • As someone that has struggled for years with sight reading, I have to say it's WELL worth the time investment in learning. While I acknowledge the validity of tab, especially knowing that in the guitar family tab was first, there is a certain universality of learning notation that is gained. 

     

    My story is this: I was in college majoring in classical guitar. Life began taking some interesting turns, so I left college and joined the US Army as a guitar player. I attended the US Navy School of Music (which at that time all Army musicians would attend) and was really put through a rigorous course. However, my sight reading didn't really improve. 

     

    Many years later, I made a commitment and started reading a little every day without fail. That has made the difference. My recommendation for reading would be to get some basics down (note values and names) through the 5th position. Then invest in various guitar methods (Mel Bay, Berklee, Hal Leonard) to really dig into positional reading. Once you've gained some comfort, the Berklee "Melodic Rhythms for Guitar" book is an amazing resource. I'd also recommend looking into Colin Rhythms. Those are instrument agnostic and present melodic rhythms in various keys. The big thing to remember is you are "reading" not learning and memorizing. Never read the same thing twice in a week. If you are serious about being a good reader, you will need to invest in some charts of various styles and instrumentation. 

     

    WHATEVER YOU DO, don't make the mistake of blowing off proficiency in flat keys. While I know flat keys are usually centered around horn players (not as guitar friendly either), the flat keys offer you the ability to perform with transposition wind instruments and not only the cliche flute players. 

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  • Jimmy Muhlenbruch said:
    If you are serious about being a good reader, you will need to invest in some charts of various styles and instrumentation.

     What charts are these? They sound useful, but I'm not quite sure what they actually are...

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  • ANY charts, sax solos, violin solos, trumpet solos. The idea is to read ANYTHING. Have enough stuff that you're not memorizing, but actually reading.

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  • Good advice, thank you.

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