DAILY UPDATES (Click Me!) Main Thread - Where the magic happens!

Welcome, one and all, to the Main Thread for this challenge!


This is where the magic happens - the thread where we'll all be posting our daily updates.

Make sure you've read the rules before replying (<- click)

 

Every day between December 6th and 19th, we are hoping to read your daily updates in this very thread right here!


Please use the following format when commenting (feel free to copy & paste!):

  • Landslag you worked on:
  • One thing you found easy:
  • One thing you found difficult:
  • (Optional): a video of you performing it!

Sample daily update:

  • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
  • One thing you found easy: The first bar was the hardest one for me to learn, although it looked easy enough on my first try.
  • One thing you found difficult: I liked that it was a single line; it allowed me to focus on every note and it was much easier to read than most pieces I play.

Feel free to make these updates as short or long as you wish!


Download the full score (click ↓):

Gulli's Lessons for each individual Landslag:

Dedicated discussion threads for each Landslag:

(More dedicated threads will be created as we progress throughout the challenge)


↓ Let's do this! Post your daily updates below ↓

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    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: The chord changes felt very easy and natural. I was actually surprise how the left hand movements seem to easily flow
    • One thing you found difficult: The gradation of the dynamics. I want to work on it a bit longer to make them more progressive. I feel I'm making too many jumps
    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Henrique wonderful, happy to hear you're joining us on this challenge, Henrique! So true about the dynamics! They are such a difficult aspect to control! I believe though that if you've noticed these things while practicing Landslag I, you are already making a lot of progress! Like Rovshan Mamedkuliev was saying in his livestream today - it all begins with the awareness.

      Like
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: I found it easy to correctly sightread for left hand notes.  Viewing the video prior to playing the first time was very helpful. I will continue to work on forward motion and dynamics.
    • One thing you found difficult: I found the small typeset to be a problem. I will soon be 68 and I prefer working from scores with larger print. I know I could enlarge the font if I used an electronic device but I think of my time playing guitar as healthy time away from screens. 
    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Martha Kreipke congrats on taking part and sticking with it despite the small font! I believe there should be an "eye-friendly" version to go with all scores, perhaps we can make it happen at some point in the future of the Landslög!

      Like 1
    •  I have been working on the Giuliani Study No 5, Op 48.    Landslag No 1 is a great piece to play before working on it. It helps to get ready to play with hands relaxed and in the correct position. 

      Like
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no.1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: Forgetting time! It's the perfect piece for a very dark day here in Germany! Left hand had a nice flow, I tried some different fingerings but ended up using the ones given by the composer!
    • One thing you found difficult: Bringing out subtle color differences that change over time (especially with my old strings). I had an especially hard time not to over-accentuate the second string in the 12th bar (would probably work with i-m better for me). I always had the urge to play it a little bit faster and I wasn't sure how to deal with the 9/8th signature (I think repeated some groups too often, haha)!
    Like 8
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      martin masterful job, Martin!!! Thanks for taking the time to do this 😀 I greatly enjoyed your interpretation! Yeah, I also changed some fingerings around, especially some right-hand ones! I wanted that Cuban-style a finger on the first string whenever I could get it, haha 😉 I'm sure Gulli won't mind - perhaps we should ask him in the watch party!

      Like 2
      • MartinTeam
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      • martin.3
      • 9 mths ago
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      Mircea Thanks, mate, haha! In hindsight, I think I rush too quickly through the piece (haven't been to Iceland yet, but I guess that that dunes behave similarly around the world in terms of velocitiy 😁), I'll take greater care of the tempo in the next Landslag. Loved your recording as well!!

      Like 1
    • Landslag I worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: The dynamics with the flow of the music came very naturally
    • One thing you found difficult: Playing slowly enough! The rhythmic triplet figure is easy enough and the semiquavers look like other fast pieces, so it's easy to slide up past the 76 tempo marking. But I found the piece much more atmospheric at the right tempo, and felt more like the winter weather martin mentioned we have here in Berlin.
    Like 2
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Roni Glaser Roni! So glad to see you doing this! I knew you would be enjoying this challenge 😁 And what's more - we found the same thing easy! I posted my reply before seeing yours, I swear! Haha

      Like
  • Oops, posted this on the topic for Landslag 1 and now realise it should have been in here. Never mind, I'll repost here and if someone could delete my post here I wont look so daft. 

    • Landslag I worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: Simple structure, no fast changes, the fingerwork isn't anything complex, could do with learning where I'm going better, but as I say below, I'm not spending a lot of time on there. 
    • One thing you found difficult: Holding a steady tempo, and not losing count of how many triplets I'd done. Was making an effort to get the dynamics in, as I tend to pick a volume and stick to it rather than following instructions.

    Lovely piece, I like the minimalist aesthetic. If I got the changes a little smoother it'd be a lovely contrast to my usual pieces.

    I like the idea of this activity, but don't have a huge amount of time to spend on it. I'm hoping to just spend an hour, max, on each piece, until they get too hard...

    Like 4
      • MirceaTeam
      • Head of Community / Live
      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Roddy wonderful job, Roddy! No worries at all about having posted in the other thread - I deleted that post, but if you want me to change things around in the future, I can also move individual replies from one thread to another 😎 just let me know if you ever need me to, I'm happy to help!

      Just to clarify, you don't have to learn a new Landslag every day - you can spend as many days on a single one as you want. If you feel like learning a new one, by all means, go ahead! But it's not an obligation.

      Like
  • Landscape I worked on: Number 1 Dark sand dunes and some moss.

    One thing I found easy:  The notes seem to lie easy for both the left and right hand and fairly easy to sight read.

    One thing I found difficult:  Keeping the tempo. I have a tendency to speed up.

    Hope to record some of the pieces later in the week.

    Like 2
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Derek awesome, Derek! It's good to see you on here!

      And so true! I noticed I tended to speed up, too, and had to consciously hold myself back throughout the piece. I feel it's the kind of work that works best when it feels like it's not rushed at all. Great observation!

      Like
  • Regarding Landslag I - I am confused about the 9/8 time signature. It seems as if the score might be mismarked based on how the composer is playing the piece with triplets. Could you explain? Thank you.

    Like 2
    • Martha Kreipke Hi Martha - here's how I think of it: there are 18 sixteenth notes in each measure, which is equivalent to 9 eighth notes, so the time signature is 9/8. But the 18 notes are arranged into six groups of three, which gives more of a 6/8 triplet-sixteenth feel. Perhaps there would be less ambiguity if the bass notes (i.e. those with downward stems) were written as dotted (rather than undotted) eighths. In any event, I would play it as you 'feel' it - that's certainly what I intend to do! (Performer's prerogative!?) Hope this helps.

      Like 1
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David David, that's exactly right! Martha: as long as all notes are even in length (before rubato, rallentando and any other things are applied), you are doing it right.

      Like
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: Sight reading the piece.
    • One thing you found difficult: Controlling the dynamics to give overall shape to the phrase.
    Like 7
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      Jaime Great job, Jaime!!! I listened to your video before reading the text update, and I was about to say "wow, nice dynamic control" when I saw that's exactly what you've been working on! Guess that means you've been extra successful! 🎉

      Like 1
  • https://youtu.be/YjLC6N7ugPA

    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: regular arpeggio
    • One thing you found difficult: Study and record it in one day😊
    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Giuseppe Gasparini Wonderful job, Giuseppe! Congratulations!!

      Like
  • Landslag 1

    Easy part: Right hand fingering being fairly consistent

    Harder part: The subtle shift in dynamics and fingering shifts for sight-reading

    Like 9
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      David Chidsey Wow, good job David! Yeah, beautiful dynamics and phrasing are the heart of music, but they can become the hardest thing, the more advanced we get! You're doing it though 💪

      Like 1
      • MartinTeam
      • LIVE
      • martin.3
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      David Chidsey I really liked your interpretation, the piece breathes very nicely!

      Like 1
  • I don't think I can study and record one a day, but I will study them, I like them.
    P.S and this I will try to record it better

    https://youtu.be/YjLC6N7ugPA

    Like 2
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      Giuseppe Gasparini Giuseppe, this is sounding great! No worries, you don't have to record every day! This challenge is about practicing every day, it's not obligatory to also put up a video every single time. I love the videos, but only post them when you can!

      (Non ti preocupare, non devi fare una registrazione ogni giorno - questo "challenge" e piu per studiare ogni giorno, non c'e obbligatorio fare sempre anche una registrazione. 😁)

      Like 1
      • MartinTeam
      • LIVE
      • martin.3
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      Giuseppe Gasparini Wonderful Giuseppe! I really enjoyed your recording, the subtle reverb adds to the production as well! I love how you actively try to avoid too much rubato within the individual bars and keep the phrase going!

      Like 1
    • martin Hi Martin thanks, you must clean it well😉

      Like
    • Mircea Hi Mircea,thanks for the advice, I will work more calmly😊

      Grazie per i consiglieri lavorerò con più calma

      Like
  • Landslag you worked on: Landslag #1 dark sand dunes with some moss

     

    Something you found easy: I liked the rhythm was all simple triplets so that I could focus on the musicality and volume changes, etc.

     

    Something you found hard: Reading music.  I'm played trombone in school 20 years ago, so I can read the rhythm on sheet music, but translating the notes to finger positions on a fretboard is really hard.

    Like 2
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Michael Sounding good, Michael! And you're right, the guitar is so much harder than most instruments when it comes to finding the notes! You're doing a great job though!

      Like 1
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: Hand positions and shifts. Reading on sight. 
    • One thing you found difficult: Keep on counting those triplets. Taming the tempo.
    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Vincent That's awesome! High five for my fellow good sight readers! 🙌

      Like
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 1: dark sand dunes with some moss
    • One thing you found easy: The beautiful succession of harmonies makes the dynamic and phrasing extremely intuitive. Always such a pleasure when these, along with being indicated, are so inherent to the music itself!
    • One thing you found difficult: Listening to Gulli's performance above, it became clear that he wanted all the notes to ring on as much as possible. This, in turn, meant I couldn't do right-hand preparation for individual arpeggios - my favorite technique for stability! Combined with my nails being way too long from lack of practice last week, plus a broken p nail, there was a lot of unnecessary movement in my right hand, in an attempt to get a good, scratch-free and beautiful sound. Watch the beginning especially!
    Like 9
      • MartinTeam
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      • martin.3
      • 9 mths ago
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      Mircea beautiful sound, man, and you're so incredibly patient with the tempo! Wonderful job, truly! Absolutely right about the right hand (good that I'm doing a workshop on Right Hand Preperation and WON'T be able to use it for that piece, haha!)

      Like 3
    • Mircea great! I will probably start my job tomorrow morning. And - maybe I am wrong - but I will play it a little faster (don't know yet). And - like Giuseppe - main problem for me is recording. I will have to use my phone 🤨 Contrary to appearances, it is not such an easy piece as it might seem at first glance...

      Like 1
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      martin thank you so much, Martin! Happy to hear you liked it 😀

      Marek Tabisz no worries about your recording quality! The videos are just a bonus - I love watching you all play, but what I and everyone else here really cares about is inspiring you to practice and document it every day! 😁 I'm sure it's going to sound great.

      Like
  • On the first day, by quick sight read the score for Landslag 1 for about 2 minutes without my guitar at hand. By identifying the chord progression and fingering for the piece. I try to play the first 10 bars to play the same appreggio pattern. 

    The easy thing found : Most notes appeared on the 1st to third frets and the appreggio patterns were similar sequence.

    The difficult thing found: the control of the volume to do crescendo or dynamics. Maybe also the consistent triplet  rhythm for each bar.  

    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Lawrence it's good to see you on here! Congratulations on starting the challenge, very happy you could join! I had more or less the same experience as you, playing the first Landslag! The dynamics were the most beautiful, but at times the hardest thing to control.

      Like 1
  • First day report: I began by reading through the entire score (i.e. all 11 pieces). Not perfectly, of course, but well enough to get an impression of the music and the difficulty. A few of the pieces (I, II, V & VI) are quite easy and should be well within my grasp. Others, while not technically difficult, present certain musical challenges: polyrhythms in III and especially VIII; shifting meters in IV (8/8 vs. 4/4) and VII (also a counting nightmare!) . A few include specific technical problems: playing above the 12th fret in IX; production of natural harmonics in X. And one - the final piece, XI - falls into the 'cross your fingers and hope for the best category'! Almost certainly beyond my capabilities, but I'll give it a try.

     

    While I can surely learn some of the easier pieces in a single day, these are for me the exceptions. Most, I think, will require the full two weeks to 'master' (I use the term loosely!). So my plan is to attack them not individually, but as a group, trying to work out the various problems a little at a a time. For example, I will certainly need to practice the two versus three polyrhythm on its own (the composer has helpfully provided some exercises) for at least a week before attempting number VIII. So I'll leave off making videos until the very end. How many of the pieces I will be able to manage is for the moment uncertain - I predict about half, but let's see where a little practice gets me!

    Like 6
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      David wonderful! I was wondering whether anyone would choose to attack them all as a group! This is a great and absolutely valid approach! I'm looking forward to hearing how it's going through your daily updates. This is a great start!

      I also peaked ahead and reached similar conclusions to you - for me, I predict the most annoying to be number X, because I will be trying to record a new one every day, and harmonic exercises are so much harder to sight read than anything else, because you can't look at the fretboard and at the music at the same time.

      (My trick is actually to place the music stand very close to me and on my left, where it forms an almost direct line of sight with my left hand in frets VII / XII 😂 not sure if you'll find this trick useful, but it did help me in the past!)

      For the polyrhythms, for me, it really helps to think of them as a linear rhythm. Don't think of 2 against 3, think: (Both), (up) (down) (up).

      See the attached file? These three patterns actually all sound the same! (well, the first one doesn't have the bass line, but they are all "2 against 3") Hope this helps 😉

      Like 2
    • Mircea I think of the rhythm exactly the same way 🙂

      Like 1
    • Mircea Thanks Mircea! I do try to think of 3 versus 2 in this general manner, but I never seem to get a satisfactory flow in the triplet - small hesitations manage to creep in, quite uninvited! (Btw, the graphic representation - which I've not seen before - is really striking: (3) looks utterly confusing, (1) looks entirely straight-forward! Strange to think that they are rhythmically equivalent.)

      Like 1
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      David I know what you mean! You are right though, with a bit of practice, those hesitations will get smoothed out.


      And that's true about the graphic representation!

      For more complex polyrhythms though, once you get to really complex things (see the video below), that spelling I used in example 3 above actually becomes the most straightforward.

      It's just that 2 against 3 is still relatively simple, in mathematical terms, so it's very easy to represent it as an aggregate rhythm (like in examples 1 and 2).

      I love polyrhythms so I could nerd out about this all day! 😁

      Like 1
  • I practice Landslag 2 today

     

    easier part: fairly easy chords although some shifts require precision

     

    harder parts: I'm never happy with my release, I'd like a more crisp and rhythmic feel when changing chords

    Like 7
    • David Chidsey Bravo👍

      Like 4
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      David Chidsey VERY good job, David - congratulations!!! The release of the chords is by far the hardest thing in this piece, and yet it works in your interpretation! Of course, it can always get better (I had the same feeling as you in my own video), but you're doing a great job already! Keep it up!

      Like 1
  • Landslag I

    The easy thing:  side reading.

    The difficult thing: requires precision when changing chords (I am constantly whistling in several places). I have difficulties with showing the changing voices (right hand) because I am trying to highlight the "hidden" melody. And....  too fine print 😉

    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Marek Tabisz wow, you stole the words right out of my mouth, Marek 😂 this is EXACTLY how I felt as I was practicing it, too! 

      Like 1
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 2
    • One thing you found easy: Sight reading the piece (again!)
    • One thing you found difficult: Achieving legato connection between the chords in the first half.
    Like 8
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Jaime great job, Jaime!! You are already doing a great job with the legato - Gulli really did not make this one easy for us 😉 I do have to say, I feel that you absolutely manage to create the illusion of legato despite the chords sometimes not ringing until the very end due to the nature of the music. And for that, you have my congratulations 😁 that can be the hardest thing to do of all!

      Like 2
  • Landslag I worked on: Landslad II

     

    Something I found easy:  the left hand fingerings were relatively simple.

     

    Something I found hard:  just about everything, but the two biggest things were trying to synchronize my right and left hands (I found I would either get the right strings with my left hand or my right, getting both together was hard); and achieving a smooth feel with minimal dead spaces between the chord changes.

     

    https://youtu.be/AJTaH2uT7e0

    Like 3
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Michael great job, Michael! Was it just my impression or did you actually play the whole thing from memory? 😱 if so, congratulations!! You are a much faster learner than I am 😀

      Like 2
    • Mircea I did play it from memory, but not because I am a fast learner.  I had to because I had to really focus on getting my right and left hands to do the right things.  Plus I am really slow at reading music, so memorizing was the only way for me to get the piece smooth.  PS love the landslög and this challenge. 

      Like 2
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Michael thank you so much! So glad to hear you're enjoying it. And no matter for what reason you did it, the fact of the matter is, you had it all memorized - and in only one day of practice! That is wonderful in and of itself.

      Like 1
  • Landslag no 1: Dark sand dunes with some moss

    Easy: I found the pace very relaxed and easy on the right hand

    Difficult: Initially some of my chord changes were not as smooth with the left hand as I would like

     

    Having visited Iceland for the first time in January this year I can really associate with the scenery described by the music

    Like 4
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Ron wonderful - welcome to the challenge, Ron! I had the same feeling as you while I was playing through the music! "Wow, this really DOES sound like Iceland" - it's amazing, right? Hope you'll have fun with these pieces over the course of the next two weeks! (and who knows, perhaps beyond)

      Like 1
  • Landslag I worked on: No 2 littoral mud in the bottom of a Ford

    What I found easy: as per no 1. Easy to sight read and fingering for both hands

    Hard! Keeping the chords ringing as long as possible and then getting a smooth change to the next one. Also there are a couple of places where in consecutive bars we have a long short note sequence followed by a short long (e.g. bars 33 and 34) which I had to concentrate to get the timing right.

     

    These are great pieces and I'm going to keep going and learn them all - I won't do it in 10 days though!

    Like 4
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Derek great, Derek! No worries, I really don't expect anyone to learn them all in these two weeks 😁 the idea is not to do a new one every day (after all, you'd run out of pieces before the 2 weeks are up!), but just to practice at least one of them every day, taking as many days per piece as you need.

      Like 1
    • Mircea I'd be happy to do the first few in 10 days and make a half decent job of it!

      Like 1
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Derek awesome! 😀 Let's do it!! 

      Like
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 2: littoral mud in the bottom of a fjord
    • One thing you found easy: playing it in general, LH and RH, choosing the tone and other musical aspects of playing it.
    • One thing you found difficult: playing the semibreves (whole notes) perfectly legato; playing a diminuendo in bars 29-31 - after many attempts at making sense of it reached the conclusion that a crescendo made more overall musical sense instead, as well as a non-arpeggiato chord for the last chord. And recording it - after several takes I did manage to do a semi-not-terrible video, until I listened back to it and found my H4n microphone made the pitch lower and the sound out of sync... 😓 I'll try some other time. Oh, sorry, that should have been one thing. Never mind.
    Like 4
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Roni Glaser I'm so sorry to hear about the recording! It's just the worst when that happens. I've had a similar issue today where I realized I hadn't turned off my noise cancellation from an earlier meeting... so all my notes were cut short before they ended 😂 had to go through the whole process of setting up and recording again!

      On a separate note, yeah, I had exactly the same issue as you when it came to the legato. Given how the music is written, there are a few things that you can do to make the chords connect better, but there aren't many - and those that work are quite advanced techniques!

      Like 2
    • Mircea it’s a bit of an arse, but it’s making good recording practice too to learn a piece to serious standard and then record it - 14 days of this and I think we can all beat those recording nerves we were talking about with Steve Goss!

      Like 1
      • MirceaTeam
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      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
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      Roni Glaser exactly!!! I think this is great practice. And peeking ahead (I have insider knowledge, lol) it will make nice prep work for Martin's 5-week recording workshop starting in early January! 😉

      Like 2
    • For those having trouble with the 2:3 rhythm, there’s something very easy you can do that my piano teacher from way back in the day taught me that I have never forgotten:

      nice cup of tea, nice cup of tea, nice cup of tea...”

      The words in bold are the 2s, and the words underlined are the 3s. Try tapping your left hand with “nice” and “tea”, and your right hand with “nice”, “cup” and tea”. There you go, you’re tapping a 2:3 polyrhythm!

      For our piece, swap the right hand for fingers i and m, and the left hand for your right hand thumb. Tada! Problem solved!

      Note: if you’re not a native English speaker and you speak a “syllable-timed” language like Spanish, French or Japanese, this might not work for you. If you speak a “stress-timed” language like German or Dutch, it should work.

      PS: If you don’t like tea, you can say “fried egg and chips”, but that might be confusing if you’re not from the UK.

      Like 2
    • Roni Glaser   Thanks!  That's helpful.  Much more intuitive than "ONE and TWO and THREE and FOUR and FIVE AND SIX and" etc, which I was doing to try to get the rhythm down.  Since we are on the subject of difficult rythms, would anyone be able to explain 9/8 time to me (as was used in Landslag 1)?  I get that you are shoving an extra 8th note into each bar, but is it counted any different than running triplets in 3/4 time?  May classical musical training was limited to high school band class, so I've really encountered 2/4 3/4 and 4/4 time before.  I'm not sure what the difference is for times like 6/8 and 9/8 etc.  Are these just a way for the composer to avoid writing triplets out?

      Like 2
    • Michael Glad it helped!

      With regard to the time signature of Landslag 1, yes, the composer has done this to avoid writing out triplets. 

      IMHO, it should be 6/8 and indicated with triplets, or perhaps 9/16 with the bars cut in half. 18/16 is not unheard of, but probably a bit much. He wants 6 pulses in a bar rather than 9, which you can see from the dotted quaver (eighth note) metronome indication. 9/8 is used for 3 groups of 3 pulses per bar, which this piece is not. I enjoyed playing it though🙂.

      Like 1
      • MirceaTeam
      • Head of Community / Live
      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Roni Glaser Great explanation on both accounts, Roni! It's really great to have you on board for this challenge!

      Like
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 2
    • One thing you found easy: The overall chord progression
    • One thing you found difficult: Coordination between right and left hand. Avoiding buzz noises as there are a lot of delicate parts.
    Like 4
      • MirceaTeam
      • Head of Community / Live
      • Mircea
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Vincent so true, Vincent! I've had the same experience about the delicate parts! Good job on sticking with it and with the challenge, though 😎

      Like 1
    • Landslag you worked on: Landslag no. 2, Littoral Mud in the Bottom of a Fjord
    • One thing you found easy: Once the piece gets going in the second half, the natural resonance of the bass strings of the guitar enables very straightforward and beautiful shifts!
    • One thing you found difficult: The first half was clearly engineered to disallow the maintaining of common left-hand fingers between chords. This is extremely difficult to achieve without noise, especially in a slow and quiet piece. Some LH preparation was possible, and yet I found myself resorting to all sorts of tricks to make the passage work as a whole. Most importantly, I had to independently release pressure in certain fingers in advance of others, in order to dampen a string that would have otherwise caused a shifting noise. The legato illusion was created therefore by maintaining certain notes while others were cut just a hair shorter than the rest of the chord. All in all, I had to use very advanced and difficult technique to make this seemingly easy piece work.
    Like 7
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