Group 1

Embark on a transformative musical journey with our exclusive two-week intensive online course designed for guitar enthusiasts eager to elevate their playing skills. Delve into the intricate world of guitar technique, with a primary focus on refining the right-hand technique and addressing various technical challenges.

  1. Right Hand Mastery: Uncover the secrets to developing a flawless right-hand technique that enhances precision, speed, and control. Our expert instructors will guide you through a comprehensive exploration of techniques tailored to elevate your playing to new heights.
  2. Villa-Lobos Study Nr. 1: Immerse yourself in the timeless beauty of Heitor Villa-Lobos' Study Nr. 1. Unpack the nuances of this iconic piece and receive personalized feedback from our instructors to perfect your interpretation.
  3. Tackling Tremolo: Demystify the complexities of tremolo, a technique that adds a mesmerizing layer of expressiveness to your playing. Learn strategies to build speed, clarity, and endurance in your tremolo execution.
  4. Arpeggio Artistry: Explore the world of arpeggios with a focus on diverse patterns. From classical to contemporary, our course provides a comprehensive understanding of arpeggio techniques, enabling you to incorporate a rich variety of patterns into your repertoire.

Timeline:

  • Sign-Up : until Sunday, Jan 21th
  • Course Period: Jan 22nd - Feb 2nd
  • Optional check-In via Zoom: Jan 30, 11am PST

 

Assignments Week 1

Week 2 Assignments

Zoom Check-In: 

https://us06web.zoom.us/rec/share/AKiO8JHQxr1OtX02mQIsCXG_uR6pat_N16SB-P6J_m2lJj2yaPTm5ax3VUxBgTyc.tuh-DNz3pHMEDTpi

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    • Jack Stewart
    • Retired
    • Jack_Stewart
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I am happy to be a part of Sanel's TWI. The first videos are focussing on aspects that I really need to work on. I have started the exercises and found they are really exposing my technical weaknesses -  which is a good thing.

    Like 1
  • Hi Everyone,

    I notated the C major and Melodic Minor Scale exercise (Video 4)  for my own practice and thought I would share it for those interested.  Strings are noted inside the circles. Let me know if you find any errors.

    • Thank you Rick Lord 

       

      bars 9-10 I do a bit different (jumping into 6th position) and in the bar 18 it is 5th string, not 6th. 

      Like
    • SANEL RED沤I膯 Thank you Sanel.  I've revised the scale above, and hopefully I've got it correct this time!

      • don
      • don.2
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Rick Lord thanks ! This is really helpful!

      Like 1
    • Rick Lord Yes, now it is correct! 

      Like 1
      • Carlo Martins
      • A scientist with a passion for the study of proteins
      • Carlo_Martins
      • 3 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Rick Lord Thank you for posting this! It's very kind of you.

      Like 1
    • Phil Brunkard
    • Enthusiastic Amateur
    • Phil_Brunkard
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi, Its Phil from Halifax. The one in West Yorkshire, England, not Nova Scotia, Canada, that is. This is my first two-week intensive as I'm also new to Tonebase. It is great to get specific emphasis on technique like this to help improve my playing. Looking forward to more learning

    Like 2
    • Dee
    • didier.1
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi all!

    Dee from Bristol here. Glad to start this 2-weeks intensive with you!

    Cheers,

    D

    Like 2
    • Dee
    • didier.1
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hello,

    I already have a question regarding the arpeggio exercise. It seems to me that Sanel is muting the bass string by having the full thumb come back on top of the string (as if he was going to play it). While practising the exercise, it occurred to me that if the thumb is doing rest strokes, it is already positioned for the next string, and that it may be more efficient to mute the string above by simply using the "back" of the thumb. For example, I can mute the 5th string with the "upper part" of my thumb while leaving it on the 4th string, ready for the next bass note. Please let me know if my explanations are unclear...

     

    Are there some issues in using that way to mute the strings? Could it be more optimal? Or is it missing the point of the exercise?

    Thanks for your help!

    Like 1
    • Dee no, you are not missing it, you are on the right way. Muting of the basses is very important thing. You are right when going upwards but going backwards may become a bit tricky - especially in the faster tempo. I do it by intuition - I mean, to come back with my thumb. 

      Like 1
      • Dee
      • didier.1
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      SANEL RED沤I膯 Thanks!!!!

      Like 1
    • Dee thanks for posting it! I was also experiencing some challenges to mute the base with this exercise. I thought it was me. I think in my case, at first, my brain still needs to internalize the synchronization of everything that is going on until I can get an independence on the thumb to go back and mute the string.

      I will try to lower the speed by a lot to see if I can get that to work.

      Thanks SANEL RED沤I膯 for confirming that the thumb muting the base is a very important part of the exercise. I was playing very well and quite fast the arpeggio without muting, but muting the base is a total different challenge. 

      I'll try to post a first video soon.

      Like 2
  • I have started practicing, and in the Arpeggio section, I too am facing a problem of sorts.

    So I have started out playing the exercise at 8th notes instead of 16th. I am noticing that I am consistently able to mute the bass notes RIGHT after they're played and not after a small gap of maybe let's say an 8th note gap or a quarter note gap. 

    should I practice at that tempo (60) till I can comfortably mute with my thumb on any beat (subdivision of a beat) of the bar? or do I pick ONE subdivision, speed it up till I can play 16th note version of that, and then move on to the next? or does it not matter at all for now when I mute?
     

    Like 1
    • Hi Sree Vardhan 

       

      You should not get crazy about the metronome at the moment. You should try it for now without a metronome and at one speed where you can still feel

      comfortable and that you feel how everything is under a control. 

       

      Once you have it then you can start with the metronome at 60. If it is too fast go for 50 or even 40. 

      Like
    • SANEL RED沤I膯 Thank you for the response! I have played it without the metronome, and started metronome practice once I felt good about doing it.

      I am currently playing slowly, using 8th notes as my subdivision (and the thumb playing a quarter note and then muting). I am getting the confidence and probably will be able to play as shown in a day or two! (hopefully haha) 

      I will totally be uploading a video in a couple of days, regardless of how much progress I have made.

      Like 1
    • Sree Vardhan looking forward! 馃榾

      Like
    • Ryan
    • Ryan.1
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi Sanil,
    I've been working on Domeniconi's "Toccata in Blue", and one of the most difficult parts for me is the attached arpeggio passage (quarter note = 120, sixth string down to D, third string down to F#). I've been practicing at 1/2 tempo (and slower) by planting p, i, and m at the start of every 3 note arpeggio. However, when I try to speed this up to 3/4 tempo or beyond, I notice that I'm closer to being able to play it with free stroke than planting. Do you have any thoughts on whether planting or free stroke is better on a series of arpeggios at a very fast tempo?

    • Hi Ryan ,

       

      you can practice at the slower tempo with planting but I would definitely do it with the free stroke in the fast tempo. I will try to play it for you and upload the video here. :-) 

      Like 1
  • Hi Sanel, what鈥檚 the name of Carlevaro鈥檚 book?

    Like 1
    • Ryan
    • Ryan.1
    • 3 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    One more question, Sanil: When we play rest strokes, we allow a little bit of bending in the highest joint of the finger (the distal joint). Should we also allow the same when playing free strokes? For years I kept this joint more rigid with free strokes, but I've recently learned I should allow the same kind of flexibility in the RH fingers, whether playing rest stroke or free. Do you have any opinion on this?  

    Like 1
    • Hi Ryan , as we spoke tonight, I don't not really bend my fingers when using the rest stroke. It would cost me some extra energy. 

      Like 1
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