Are there any tech gadgets or apps that you think could revolutionize music learning or performance in the future?

Hello tonebuddies! 🎵

We are living in an incredible era of technological advancement that's seeping into every facet of our lives. From how we communicate, to how we learn and create, technology is revolutionizing the landscape. The music industry is certainly not an exception. 🚀

The digital world has opened doors to resources and tools that our musical predecessors could only dream of. From tuning apps to digital sheet music, online masterclasses to virtual performances, we've seen some significant shifts already. But the question is, what comes next?

So, I throw the baton to you, the creative innovators of our community. 🌟

Are there any tech gadgets or apps that you think could revolutionize music learning or performance in the future?

Maybe you've stumbled upon an innovative app that uses AI to help with composing or improvising? Perhaps there's a VR tool that allows you to simulate live performances from your living room? Or maybe you've heard about cutting-edge technology in development that aims to change the game for musicians?

Remember, no idea or thought is too 'out there' in this discussion. We're in the business of creativity after all. Looking forward to hearing your insights and having a spirited discussion about the future of music! 🎶

Happy Practicing! 🎸

P.S.: If you have a link to a video, article, or website relating to your gadget or app, feel free to include it. Sharing is caring!

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  • It's not new, but I am applying a concept in a new way for my own learning. With a new Zoom recorder recently purchased, I have been more often recording just my audio. Then I look at the sound wavelengths created with rendering software. I look at the highs and low peaks. I view my tempo in action. I can see my miscues. Thia very much helps me to shape the next effort. From time to time, I also record the audio of another performer playing the same score. I put one on top of the other in the software and compare presentations. I never play the two at the same time. I just look at the wavelengths. Some of the difference, of course, is the mere fact I am recording more often.

    Like 3
      • Immanuel
      • Immanuel
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Stephen Holland Hi Stephen. This sounds interesting.How do you identify a miscue by looking at the wavelength?

      Like
    • Immanuel Hello Immanuel, Thank you for your excellent question. I will try to expand upon the "miscues" word. Lately, I have been working with Lagrima. As with most scores, I start with melody and then build in the bottom voices. Putting all voices together with the needed balance is an issue for me. With that said, I started to record only the audio, not the video. Then I bring the audio into a software program to render. The wavelengths that I see on the software system helps me to better balance the voices. I can see where my right hand is striking too hard as the pitch is overly accentuated. Further, I can see where the bottom voices are in need of being made louder as I have a tendency to play them too quietly, especially the bass. Here, too, I can see the B note (and others) that repeat in the middle voice. I start well by keeping it quiet and tender, but can lose that approach quickly as the pitch line rises. My tempo can also be a challenge, and I can see where it is off as the spacing starts to widen or narrow. So, I work to make the ups and downs of repeating wavelengths in passages even. In addition, I often record the audio of an accomplished performer. Then I place my effort and the other player's presentations on top of each other. I never play them together, as this would be a terrible sound. But by just seeing where the pitches and flow of tempo compare is very helpful to me. I do render the two just to have a record for the sake of my learning. I hope this helps. Thank you for asking.

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      • Immanuel
      • Immanuel
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Stephen Holland Thanks for the comprehensive reply. I have never heard of someone doing this before. Some time back I sort of had a similar idea I wanted to be able to measure the loudness and softness of a piece. So often you think your dynamics are significant but find they aren't. When I record myself and listen back I often try to listen for particular things, for example I will concentrate my listening on the bass, or maybe the legato of the melody or the venues of the rhythm. Maybe I should make a listening checklist!

      Like
    • Stephen Holland  Hello Stephen, I discovered the same thing, when due to covid our guitar orchestra moved to online. Our conductor sent out recorded tracks that we then recorded ourselves with. I used performer lite software (which came with my motu interface). The software shows the wave form and makes it easy to see the visual representation of your playing and I found it quite informative toward improving my playing.

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    • Robert St Cyr Hello Robert... thanks for mentioning the software that you use. I will check it out for myself. I use Camtasia right now. Having a visual representation does make it easy. Your orchestra director made a smart move with you all.

      Like
    • don
    • don.2
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Ive been learning classical guitar via online resources and zoom lessons. It has been great but there are still limitations as my teacher cannot physically check my posture etc. apps for music theory and aural training though are getting better with faster processor and better mic in devices that allows for more interactive learning experience.  The one that i regularly use is Ear master. 
     

    Maybe more for piano and less for guitar but I think the apple vision pro (future gen) will be the missing piece for online learning. Specifically the minute motion detection that can identify posture or strokes. 
     

    Also applies to learning extensions such as open mic, masterclasses, chamber music. May be another 6-10 years before the tech matured but Im convinced it will happen.  Just dont make my guitar into those gadgetry type.  
     

    Not too keen on AI generated music as it takes away the human aspect of music. That said Ill still check out the Beatles final tracked done by AI. Hope we dont go down this way.   

    Like 2
    • don  really refined playing relies on very subtle nuances of touch that are more suited to learning in person from a good teacher. That being said I have used some online resources as the access to master lessons from really high level players is very informative and enlightening. Still on line lessons can't replace in person althogether.

      Like 1
      • don
      • don.2
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Robert St Cyr Yes for sure. I agree with you 100% on this. There are times when my online teacher and I agree that there are limitations as in he cannot correct my posture, or hearing exactly how loud or soft I'm playing or other nuances when a person watches you live. 

       

      Unfortunately I do not have luck with a in person teacher Either teaches like he would teach a grade school children or just going through the motion and trying to get you to go for some grade exams so they can charge more for a lesson.  

      Like
  • Using the slo motion camera on your iPhone will reveal missteps in your playing that even the best wouldn’t notice. Mostly incorrect right hand technique. Record yourself playing a 2 octave scale using different patterns im ia ma 

    Watch for crossing the strings correctly and any repeated right hand fingers. 

    Like 4
    • m Mage mAmbassador
    • Performer • Songwriter • Nationally Certified Teacher of Music
    • Mage_Music
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I use Tonara to track both my practice and that of my students as well as communicate with them.

    Like 1
    • Pauline
    • Pauline
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Excellent question thoughtfully presented. Thank you, Martin! I think it would be exquisite if technology could "transmit" to our olfactory sense.  Imagine listening to, say, "The Hills Are Alive" sung by Julie Andrews, and one could simultaneously breathe in the cool, fresh mountain air.

     

    Or Debussy's "La Mer" and one could smell the freshness and saltiness of the sea?

    Like
    • Pauline
    • Pauline
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    That being said, I profoundly value the beauty of simplicity, too. That there is no substitute for meaningful human connection unaided by technology: soul to soul.

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    • Pauline
    • Pauline
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Case in point...the meaningful and thoughtful way you offered this discussion to us, Martin, engages us. If it had been AI generated or tech-driven, the delivery may have been different. Mechanical and sterile. Although I know AI can mimic/present amazing things.

    Like
    • John
    • John.38
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I use power music professional to collect and organize all my sheet music, books and pedagogic stuff in one place, expensive but worth it.  I use guitar pro eight for composition and playback

    and learning.  Worth the investment.  I also occasionally buy specific lessons  from the purple platform - mostly fingerstyle pop stuff.  Classclef offers much free sheet music in different formats especially for guitar pro 8.  Douglass Neidt also has quite a few very detailed lessons on his site, but expensive. 

    Like
    • David
    • David.39
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I would like a fretboard knowledge VR app that trains my inner eye to see standard notation and the various locations on the fretboard . Or perhaps a standard notation app that shows the positions on the fretboard or visa versa. Anyway, a tool to assist in mastering fretboard “geography “, that provides fretboard harmonization tools as well. Standard notation and chord symbols/figured bass is amazingly efficient, but the idiosyncratic nature of realizing traditional notation on the guitar makes the process of learning (i.e; to sightread and harmonize) less one-to-one than on, say, the piano, imo. I for one would appreciate tech and pedagogy applied on tech to make the learning process more efficient so I can get to play the kind of harmonically interesting music that I want to play sooner. Life is too short, and I am an adult novice; I can use all the help I can get!

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    • David 

       

      Hi I am using the App called ''SmartChord'' for Android.

      This is a cool app that includes a lot of tools for guitar players including a fretboard trainer. However this app is available for Android only.

       

      There is also this web site:

      https://www.musictheory.net/exercises

       

      Which also includes many tools for training including a fretboard trainer.

       

      Hope this will help

      Like
      • David
      • David.39
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Andre Bernier hoping they release an ios version for an iphone/ipad. It looks promising. Thank you very much for the information 

      Like
    • Immanuel
    • Immanuel
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    In the future "live" music could be commonplace in restaurants with AIs playing "live" classical guitar music. They may be replicas of a famous guitarist or maybe not. In the most expensive restaurants the music selection will be carefully curated by a "famous guitarist" in the same way famous chefs create the menu. Occasionally the famous guitarist will make surprise "live" i.e "over the internet" appearances to talk to guests. You heard it here first! LOL

    Like 1
    • Immanuel
    • Immanuel
    • 8 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    One potential tech gadget or app that could revolutionize music learning and performance in the future is a "Smart Music Tutor."

    The Smart Music Tutor would be an AI-powered device or application that combines advanced machine learning algorithms with real-time feedback and personalized instruction. Here's how it could work:

    1. Instrument-Specific Guidance: The Smart Music Tutor would cater to different musical instruments, offering customized guidance and lessons for each one. Whether you play the guitar, piano, violin, or any other instrument, the tutor would adapt its instruction to suit your instrument of choice.

    2. Real-Time Feedback: Using built-in sensors or external attachments, the Smart Music Tutor would analyze your performance in real-time. It would provide immediate feedback on aspects like timing, rhythm, pitch accuracy, technique, and dynamics. The tutor would highlight areas for improvement and suggest specific exercises or practice routines to address them.

    3. Interactive Lessons: The Smart Music Tutor would offer interactive lessons that go beyond static sheet music. It could display interactive notation on a screen or project it directly onto your instrument, guiding you through the music in a dynamic and visual way. The tutor could adapt the lesson difficulty based on your skill level, gradually introducing more complex techniques as you progress.

    4. Intelligent Practice Recommendations: The tutor would track your practice sessions and use AI algorithms to analyze your progress over time. Based on this analysis, it would provide tailored practice recommendations to help you optimize your learning and overcome specific challenges. It could suggest exercises, drills, or even personalized compositions to keep you engaged and motivated.

    5. Virtual Ensemble and Collaboration: The Smart Music Tutor could connect with other devices or musicians remotely, allowing you to engage in virtual ensembles and collaborative performances. It could synchronize multiple musicians' performances and provide feedback on the overall cohesion and balance of the ensemble. This feature would enable musicians to practice and perform together, regardless of their physical location.

    Overall, the Smart Music Tutor would enhance the traditional music learning experience by leveraging AI, real-time feedback, and personalized instruction. It would provide aspiring musicians with an intelligent and interactive tool to improve their skills, boost their creativity, and connect with a global community of musicians.

    Like
  • I have a question regarding recording.

    I would like to find an Android App or online software that I can use to edit (modify) the sound track of my video recording of practice sessions.

    I am using an android phone for the recording connected to my guitar Fisman Preysis preamp through an audio interface.

     

    Any suggestions?

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      • Immanuel
      • Immanuel
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Andre Bernier Reaper maybe?

      Like
    • Immanuel Yes, this is a good software but they do not have an Android or online version.

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