Week 4: Spain in 19th ! 🐂

Welcome to the Main Thread for the second week of the "Around the 19th Century Guitar World" challenge! 

In the beginning of the 19th century the prevailing compositional style in Spain was similar to other places in Southern Europe. Over the course of the next hundred years through influential figures such as Aguado, Ferrer, and Tarrega, Spanish classical guitar will develop it’s own unique voice that will become the dominant style of classical guitar in the 20th century.


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    • Barney
    • Barney
    • 1 mth ago
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    Anyone know if there is a watch party scheduled for this 19th century challenge, so we can all watch together and enjoy some of the highlights again?

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    • Barney Eric Phillips you're right Barney, we decline Eric's proposal! About the challenge it's more than possible it just went that way because of a series of unexpected events, but for sure it was also unexpected.

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    • Wainull
    • Wai_Ng
    • 1 mth ago
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    Study in E Minor - Francisco Tárrega

    Thank Eric for introducing this beautiful little piece to me. Still need time to polish it, but since this month's challenge is about to end, I decided to make a quick recording after only 1 day of practice. 😅

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    • Wai That's  really good, Wai, especially for just one day. Even the two most difficult measures (in the B section) are quite smooth and well-executed, Good job!

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Eric Phillips Thank you, Eric! There is an Easter egg around 1:08, could you hear that?😂

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    • Wai I see a little picture of a cat come in at 1:08, but I don’t hear anything. Is that what you mean?

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Eric Phillips Ha, no, not the picture. It was my cat protesting in the background, but since his voice was very little, you need to really pay attention in order to hear his voice. 😸

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    • Wai That was well done, Wai, especially after only 1 day of practice! I doubt I could play a C major scale after only 1 day, it takes me so long to get even simple works up to speed.

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    • Wai great Wai, that sounds really good! If you permit me one comment, or suggestion, that'd be to ensure you play «p» and «a» together most the time and not one after the other each time. 

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    • Jack Stewart speed is relative, you prove it with the Grande Ouverture! And what about a chromatic scale? 🤔

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    • Blaise Laflamme Idk Blaise. A chromatic scale has so many more notes!😲

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    • Jack Stewart just play the four first fingers 😵

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    • Wai beautiful Wai. It’s a great piece to start your practice routine with. If only to adjust your tone and phrasing and enjoy the beauty of the simple melody and the sound of your guitar…

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Jack Stewart Thanks, Jack. Normally, it's very hard for me to memorize music no matter how many times I practiced, but this time, I don't know why I could memorize this piece very quickly. Maybe that's the reason why I could record it after 1 day of practice. 🙄

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 1 mth ago
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      Blaise Laflamme Thanks, Blaise. I didn't aware of the time discrepancy between p and a when I was recording, I just naturally played that way. Thanks for pointing it out, but even now I am aware of the problem, I found that it's still hard to change. 😂

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 1 mth ago
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      joosje Thanks, joosje. Yes, this piece is very enjoyable to play. Since I have memorized it, I found that I would play it once or twice every time I picked up the guitar. 👍

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    • Wai you're right that's hard to change once you started doing it more naturally everywhere and now that you are aware you'll resolve it quickly, if you pay attention, before it becomes a bad habit instead of a tool you choose to use. This technique works great to put emphasis on the melody when you start a phrase or reach a climax, as an example, but everywhere ensure you loose the effect more than you make one. 👍

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