Group 2

Announcing the first Two Week Intensive with Peter Graneis!

Say goodbye to struggling with speed and effort, and hello to playing scales with ease using the technique of using three fingers instead of two. Discover the power of p•m•i and learn how to take your playing to new heights.

Throughout the course, we'll explore the nuances of p•m•i versus a•m•i, and how to achieve the perfect balance between speed and power. It's important to note that this technique is not just about speed, but also about control, and we'll guide you through the process from basic movements to advanced exercises.

While scales played with p•m•i may make it impossible to play any simultaneous accompaniment, you'll be amazed at the new world of possibilities that will open up for you. Don't miss out on this unique opportunity to take your guitar playing to the next level!

Check out Peter's Lessons on tonebase!

Details

  • Sign-Up: April 12th, 9am
  • Course Period: April 17th -28th
  • Optional check-In via Zoom: April 24th, 10am PST

Assignments

  • Get ready to dive into the world of Three Finger Scales with Peter! Watch the Intro Video now and discover the concepts behind this fascinating technique, complete with Peter's expert insights and pmi. Don't miss out!

  • You're one step closer to mastering the Three Finger Scales technique. Begin your journey by watching Video 1/3, and then dive into the exercises found in the "3-Finger Scales 1_3" document. Get ready to elevate your playing to the next level!

  • Test your skills and explore the "3-Finger Scales Examples" document to try and come up with some pmi fingerings for the scales. We'll be diving into this very document during our upcoming Zoom Check-In, so come prepared to share your findings and learn even more!

3-Finger Scales 1_3

3-Finger Scales Examples  

 

Video 2/3

3-Finger Scales 2_3

 

Video 3/3

3-Finger Scales 3_3 

3-Finger Scales Examples 

Have fun with the last video and explore Peter's solution to the examples!

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  • Hello, I am looking forward to learning a different approach to playing scales. 

    Like 1
    • David
    • David.39
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I’m looking forward to learning how to incorporate scales into my practice. Currently, I somewhat mechanically play a left hand three-note per string scale , alternating im in the right hand. As preparation for the intensive, I wondered if Peter Graneis might recommend any specific references on LH and RH scale patterns/standard scale routines that are assumed background information for this intensive, or otherwise useful as a technical foundation for the instrument and its repertoire?

    Like 1
    • David hi David, there’s no assumed background information here. I made three different work sheets and paired them with three videos where I go through all the exercises that are needed for this course. We’re basically building up the technique by learning the required principles, that can ultimately be applied to your own repertoire. There’s another worksheet where you can try to find a suitable rh-fingering for some short snippets of popular repertoire, which we will discuss further in the check in on Monday.

      I hope this answers your question!

      Like 1
      • David
      • David.39
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Peter Graneis thank you very much for the detailed reply on prerequisites for the TWI.

      As a follow-up question, do you have any favorite scale studies or references or sheet music recommendations for a more novice player?

      My understanding is that scale technical work on the guitar focuses quite a bit on the RH. For the LH, I am becoming familiar with a set of (5?) no-stretch open string and movable scale patterns with shifts incorporated for two octaves, or a few three-note-per-string movable patterns.
      I also under the impression that scale work on the guitar contrasts that done on, say, piano or violin; the patterns in the LH are repeated up the fretboard such that there is redundancy in religiously going through all 24 major and minor keys, and the frets are all spaced in half-steps and assist in correcting for any small placement errors.
      Finally, As mentioned in the introductory video, scale passages are not terribly common in the repertoire (perhaps as contrasted with piano music?).
      Nonetheless , at the very least, I am reading written-out scales to work on my fretboard “literacy” to improve sight reading, and to work on dynamics, articulation, tone and LH-RH synchronization.
      As might be evident from my description above, I’m a bit confused by the LH options and any advice on how best to help improve my understanding and technical mastery of fingerings would be much appreciated. Perhaps there are standard references that would help me learn the various options and the pros and cons of each? 

       Thank you very much for the ideas presented in the videos. I’m enjoying the challenges of the assignment!

      Like
    • David hi David, I’ll try to answer all your questions: 

      For now I would work with the few scales included in the work sheet. There are a total of 3 worksheets that gradually build up more and more complex scales, step by step building up both hands. In the beginning the focus is very much on the right hand, in order to learn this technique, that’s why it seems like we’re not covering left hand/ syncing up both hands. We will! 
      however I would completely disregard looking at much music theory for now, in order to give this technique a chance we have to establish rh-control. 

      Like 2
    • Ollipekka
    • Ollipekka
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hello Maestro Graneis, hi fellow members,

     

    Looking forward to this intensive course. I've been working somewhat irregularly on AMI-scales for years now, and I'm especially excited to learn about the differences between these two techniques.

    Like 1
  • Hi! My name is Hélène. Looking forward to work on my scales. I am an advance player, but never considered myself a fast player, although I can play fast arpeggios and tremolo. So I think PMI will help me love doing scales again!

    Like 1
    • Calin Lupa
    • Calin_Lupa
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Thank you for the exercises Peter Graneis, balancing p with i,m,a is something I definitely need to work on, the exercises are very helpful.

    Like 1
    • Larry Baziw
    • LarryB
    • Larry_Baziw
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view
    • Peter_Graneis  Hi Peter and Group 2.
      I am late starting the Three Finger Scales and looking forward to joining the Zoom Call today.
      Question I have is for a beginner classical guitarist, I find the shifting from 3 finger to 2 finger mid scale challenging, especially when combining ascending and descending in one run.  
      Without creating a bad habit, Would just repeating the 3 - 2 parts be a good additional exercise to start ?
    Like 1
    • Larry Baziw hi Larry,

      2 ways to work on this: the obvious one being reducing speed. By this I mean finding a speed where you are able to play the exercise relaxed and flawlessly, building up speed in small steps from there. 
      the other one is playing the exercise in question (6) with only the right hand first, in order to get used to the system. 
      hope this helps!

      Like
      • Larry Baziw
      • LarryB
      • Larry_Baziw
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Peter Graneis 

      I will slow down and do small speed steps.
      I’ve noticed using just the right hand  gave me a better focus and sense of the individual p-m-i movements.

      Thank you ! 

       . 

      Like 1
    • martinTeam
    • LIVE
    • martin.3
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view
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