Carlevaro - Technique

This discussion thread is dedicated to Carlevaro's technical aspect of his work.

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Maestro Carlevaro introduced his technical ideas to his students by using the technical Cuadernos accompanied by the School of Guitar book.

  • School of Guitar: Exposition of Instrumental Theory
  • Didactic Serie for Guitar, Cuaderno #1 - Diatonic Scales
  • Didactic Serie for Guitar, Cuaderno #2 - Right Hand Technique
  • Didactic Serie for Guitar, Cuaderno #3 - Left Hand Technique
  • Didactic Serie for Guitar, Cuaderno #4 - Left Hand Technique (Conclusion)
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    • Calin Lupa
    • Calin_Lupa
    • 7 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Posting here a reply I got from Dale Needles  (thank you!) , on the HVL challenge ,on the relation between toques and piano/forte, which I found useful. 

    " For each of Carlevaro's "toques" one can elicit a forte and piano dynamic.  Additionally, each toque gives a different timbre or color to the sound.  However, there are a few exceptions to this and it should not be interpreted too literally. For example, toque 5 which is used to bring out a metallic timbre, is almost always used when playing piano. "

    Are there any recommendations on the relations between toques and playing more tasto  vs ponticelli? 

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      • Calin Lupa
      • Calin_Lupa
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Dale Needles thank you for sharing these details, very interesting.  Achieving the desired timbre, volume and color via toques, without too much or no longitudinal hand movement, is something to strive for.  For me, the RH movement tends to destabilize my hand especially for fast tempo pieces.  I think as guitarists we have to experiment with  different toques and angles of the wrist and fingers on the strings, to try to get to that level. 

      Btw it would be so cool if you had some recordings of the Maestro playing your guitars.  I know  back then it was not as easy as today to record, when one can just get the phone out and start recording.  :) 

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    • Calin Lupa that's the beauty of Carlevaro's technique and combined with a bit of imagination you can create beautiful sound paintings. For sure moving the right hand is required in many situations but it make things happening in a row while with proper mechanics you can make them happening simultaneously.

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  • As has been previously mentioned, Carlevaro dedicates Cuaderno No. 2 to right-hand exercises.  He begins with a series of arpeggio exercises with the goal of developing independence and flexibility of the fingers.  The first 84 formulas are arpeggio patterns that can be grouped into sets of 12. Carlevaro writes the following about practicing these arpeggio sets:  "The first phase deals with the three fingers and thumb working together at the same dynamic level and has the aim of liberating them one from the other from a mechanical point of view.  Nuances in timbre and variations in intensity are to be left for another stage...Once the first twelve exercises have been assimilated, it is advisable to associate each L.H. change of position with a different R.H. formula, but without causing delay or breaking the continuity."  (School of Guitar) The following post includes Formulas 1-12, playing a different arpeggio pattern on each fret (moving up and down the neck).  During this first phase, toque 1 (similar to a free stroke) is used for i,m,a. 

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    • Dale Needles thanks for sharing this exercise Dale, it reminds me my early 90's 😅

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      • Calin Lupa
      • Calin_Lupa
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Dale Needles thank you, great exercises for RH fingers independence , I'll include in my routine. 

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