Learning a piece

Hi All,

 

I just started learning first piece 'Lagrima' from Tonebase archive. While analyzing the piece we have to identify which chords are played (C7/ E etc). I'm stuck at this level now since I can't identity these chords.

Is there any course for that on Tonebase or from where should I learn that?

7replies Oldest first
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Active threads
  • Popular
    • David Krupka
    • Amateur guitarist/lutenist
    • David_Krupka
    • 2 yrs ago
    • Reported - view

    I wouldn't let this hold you up, Nikhil. To learn all the theory you need to make a harmonic analysis of a piece like Lagrima will take a long time. For the present purpose, your analysis should be much more basic - you should try to answer such questions as 'what is the time signature of the piece?' 'what is the key signature?' and' 'what is the general structure?'. For Lagrima, the answers would be: it is in 3/4 time; the first (A) section is in E major and the second (B) section in E minor; the structure (taking into account the repeats) is AABBA. You might also note that the first two measures are repeated in measures 3-4. Perhaps you might also note where potential problems lie: the barres in measures 7, 9 and 12, for example, and the high notes in measures 5, 11, and 14. (Of course, what any individual considers problematic will depend very much on their particular level.) Once you have a general idea of how the piece unfolds, you are ready to start the more difficult task of getting your fingers to play it! (Btw, I personally wouldn't spend more than four or five minutes on the initial analysis - but needless to say, I don't play at anything like Thomas Viloteau's level!) I hope this helps - let us know how you progress with the piece! 

    Like 2
      • Nikhil
      • Nikhil
      • 2 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      David Krupka yes that was certainly helpful, David. Thank you so much for all the help :) 
      I had actually stopped following Lagrima course after the analysis (2nd) video, since it all went over my head and I was about to start with "Beginner Guitar - 2' course. 

      but now I think I'll resume it and as you suggested, won't focus on analysis yet.

      However David, it is still unanswered how do I start working on Analysis part? how do I find out chords? 

      Like
  • I just picked up this piece for the first time too. And I had the same questions about analysis so David Krupka answer and suggestions helps a lot because I already over analyze stuff in general. However I like where Nikhil was going with her suggestion because I鈥檇 like to be able to identify chords and cadences in a piece. 
    FWIW, I do learn a lot about analysis (even though most of it is over my head) just listening in on some of the advanced repertoire lessons. In case that helps.

    Like 1
      • David Krupka
      • Amateur guitarist/lutenist
      • David_Krupka
      • 2 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Kevin Mudd I certainly agree that music theory is not rocket science! For the motivated learner, a lot of ground can be covered in a few months. I subscribe however to the idea that theory is best learned in the context of actual musical sounds. It's one thing to know, for example, how a minor seventh chord is constructed, but quite another to be able to 'hear' it in one's mind. And if you can't hear it, it doesn't strike me as too useful to know how it's put together. I think it's also quite useful to learn theory in the context of the fretboard, although this is not the standard method in classical music, as far as I know. I think guitarists of other styles, particularly jazz, but also contemporary pop, tend to have a far better understanding of their instrument than we classical guitarists do. For those here wanting to learn more theory, I recommend going to youtube and seeing what's available in the non-classical world. Let me emphasize that this is an idiosyncratic opinion, and likely not shared by many of the ToneBase faculty!

      Like 1
      • martinTeam
      • LIVE
      • martin.3
      • 2 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Kevin Mudd hi Kevin! I'd recommend some of Ashley (Ash) Lucero s livestream, her livestreams are packed with harmonic analysises! But I'd keep your and David Krupka s suggestions in mind and might share my approach to theory and especially aural training in a livestream!

      Like 2
    • David Krupka Thank you for the suggestions. I 100% agree with you about learning by just playing more music. I have used YouTube a lot to learn theory and interestingly I found a blues player who I have learned a lot from. And also there is a jazz piano guy that has a software called Mapping Tonal Harmony Pro and he does a lot of videos on functional analysis that I have been looking at and learning albeit way over my head.

      But I really don't want to get away from playing my guitar, so I think I'll take your questions above and focus on those basic questions in the beginning so that I can keep playing.

      Like
    • Martin Thanks Martin I'll check Ash out in the livestream.

      Like
Like Follow
  • 2 yrs agoLast active
  • 7Replies
  • 60Views
  • 4 Following

Home

View all topics