Group 4

Announcing the first Two Week Intensive with Peter Graneis!

Say goodbye to struggling with speed and effort, and hello to playing scales with ease using the technique of using three fingers instead of two. Discover the power of p•m•i and learn how to take your playing to new heights.

Throughout the course, we'll explore the nuances of p•m•i versus a•m•i, and how to achieve the perfect balance between speed and power. It's important to note that this technique is not just about speed, but also about control, and we'll guide you through the process from basic movements to advanced exercises.

While scales played with p•m•i may make it impossible to play any simultaneous accompaniment, you'll be amazed at the new world of possibilities that will open up for you. Don't miss out on this unique opportunity to take your guitar playing to the next level!

Check out Peter's Lessons on tonebase!

Details

  • Sign-Up: April 12th, 9am
  • Course Period: April 17th -28th
  • Optional check-In via Zoom: April 24th, 10am PST

Assignments

  • Get ready to dive into the world of Three Finger Scales with Peter! Watch the Intro Video now and discover the concepts behind this fascinating technique, complete with Peter's expert insights and pmi. Don't miss out!

  • You're one step closer to mastering the Three Finger Scales technique. Begin your journey by watching Video 1/3, and then dive into the exercises found in the "3-Finger Scales 1_3" document. Get ready to elevate your playing to the next level!

  • Test your skills and explore the "3-Finger Scales Examples" document to try and come up with some pmi fingerings for the scales. We'll be diving into this very document during our upcoming Zoom Check-In, so come prepared to share your findings and learn even more!

3-Finger Scales 1_3

3-Finger Scales Examples  

 

Video 2/3

3-Finger Scales 2_3

 

Video 3/3

3-Finger Scales 3_3 

3-Finger Scales Examples 

Have fun with the last video and explore Peter's solution to the examples!

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  • Hi I am Peter H. I am a high intermediate player (what ever that means). Question: are we suppose to make and submit a video? 

    Like 1
    • peter hancock hi Peter! You’re encouraged to submit videos and I will periodically check in and answer questions/ give feedback 

      Like
    • Peter Graneis 

      I submitted the videos. I know they are not the best.  Exercise #4 is there twice. Had trouble uploading it. 

      Like
  • I'm Dave from So. Cal. I'm a level 6-7 player. I recently had surgery on my right thumb for osteoarthritis issues.  I had the exact same surgery on my left hand a year ago. It was highly successful. I'm looking forward to using this challenge as a means of physical therapy for my left hand, but to also improve my scale and speed skills. 

    Like 1
    • Maria
    • Maria
    • 11 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hello, I am Maria.

    I have used sometimes pmi to cope with difficult scales in some pieces but I was never taught this technique with a system. So I am looking forward to learn this technique to improve my scales and to be able to teach my students more effectively.

    Like 1
    • Paul
    • Paul.17
    • 11 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi, I'm Paul from St. Louis.  I'm looking forward to learning this technique to help make high speed passages easier.

    Like 1
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    • peter hancock Hi Peter, Here’s a bit of feedback for your exercises.

      It already looks very natural and fluent, try not to sing along though, this will always take away some of our ability to focus on our hands and it doesn’t occur in repertoire. There are definitely cases where this can be helpful, but for this technique I suggest not to do it. 
       

      for 1 and 2: in general it’s time to work with a metronome now. I  suggest starting with ~50-55 for quarter notes and concentrating on regularity and flow. Spend a minute or two here, then move up in small steps.

       

      for 3 and 4, set the metronome to ~40-45, always complete one line in one go for a minute at a time, then move up the metronome. Pay attention in ex. 4: you tend to play very short notes, try to play them as Legato as possible. 
       

      in general this stage is about control, not speed. Keep it up!

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    • Peter Graneis  Thanks. Will keep trying.

      Like 1
    • Jack Stewart
    • Retired
    • Jack_Stewart
    • 11 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi Peter. I am Jack from Oakland, Ca. I am honored to participate in your workshop. 

    This is my first posting of these exercises. They are pretty rough but have gotten better over the last couple of days (hard to believe.).

    Like 1
    • Jack Stewart hi Jack, here’s some feedback for your video:

       

      throughout the video there’s already a nice development. It’s great that you’re using a metronome straight away, sounds like you set it to roughly 60bpm. This could be a great tempo to work with, but I’d advise you to not play triplets, since this tends to train the thumb to play with an accent. 
      Another aspect I’d like you to direct your attention to is articulation: the quality of the Staccato tends to vary between different fingers of the right hand. 
       

      To work on this, start with eighth notes (2 notes per beat). Pay attention to a regular quality and only switch between very staccato and very legato. 
       

      when accenting single notes in groups of 4/5/2, start at half the speed (said eighth notes instead of four notes per beat) and pay attention to the accented note sticking out and the overall sound being either staccato or legato. 
       

      hope this helps! Happy practicing 

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      • Jack Stewart
      • Retired
      • Jack_Stewart
      • 11 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Peter Graneis Thanks for the response. All very good points that I need to work on. I'll post my progress (hopefully) on them soon.

      Like 1
      • Jack Stewart
      • Retired
      • Jack_Stewart
      • 11 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Peter Graneis Hey Peter. Over the last couple of months I have had to resort to playing with no nails due to deteriorating fingernails. This has led to a blister on my 'a' finger. Therefore I will have to stop playing over the next couple of days.

      I have incorporated the 'pmi' technique into my daily practice and was about to record my progress on the G major scale. If the blister clears up in the next couple of days I will post a new video.

      If I cannot get another video before the end of this workshop (not sure when it ends), I would like to thank you for this workshop and find the 'pmi' technique very promising and useful. Thank you.

      Like
    • Derek
    • Derek
    • 11 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I'm sorry that I missed the zoom check in. Monday evening at 6pm (UK time) is not so good for me as I look after my granddaughter that evening. I'm enjoying the exercises though. I was wondering if you would use p,m,i for a descending chromatic scale from the 12th fret E on the first string to the 3rd fret F on the fourth string (I'm particularly thinking of Coste - Les Soirees d'Auteil) or whether you could extend it to p,a,m,i?  Thanks Derek

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    • Derek hi Derek. This was actually part of the check in, it’s a valid question. Short answer: I have no solution for playing a chromatic scale with only these three fingers. Tremolo fingering is a possibility, also involving slurs and open strings can help, but the method I have been teaching can not really help in this case. Sorry!

      Like
  • Hello Peter,
    Thank you for the great workshop!
    I tried (maybe to soon) to work directly on the music (Lobos etude Nr. 7).  Therefore I send you a video recording and music sheet how I executed and interpreted the PMI movement. I wonder what you think of the fingering.  Sorry for the sluggish to fast playing.
    I'm also working on the scale of etude Nr 12 but I find the change from PMI to PM quiet difficult; my hand goes out of balance at that point on the 6th string.
    So far thanks again!
    Lázaro

    • Lázaro Tejedor Hi Lazaro, in principle this looks like it could be working for you, you’re following the principles closely and it looks quite good. However there are two points I like doing differently. For one I like to finish each scale with p, and the first scale is changing position too much for my taste. This is personal preference and it could just as well work perfectly for you, but for me this tends to slow down the left hand a little and result in problems with synchronicity. Hope this helps!

      Like
  • Hi Peter,

    Thank you for the comment. You’re right: I will try to end with P by introducing a slur or use P M.

    And I think it’s also better not to have to much position change. I will start working on it. Thanks again. 

    Like 1
    • martinTeam
    • LIVE
    • martin.3
    • 11 mths ago
    • Reported - view
    • martin 

      Hello Martin,

      I assume the meeting is today? I’m very sorry not being able to participate. I’m in the French Alps (with guitar:) but without a proper WIFI. 
      Is it possible to follow the meeting on a later moment? 
      Thanks for organizing this great workshop! 

      Like
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