Need a beginner routine

I've been teaching myself for the past 3 months using a combination of the material from thisisclassicalguitar.com and Scott Tenant's "Pumping Nylon" book. I'm getting overwhelmed and I'd like to find/create a good, 30 minute routine for a beginner like me so I can develop my technique incrementally while I follow the basic course here.

 

I've been an orchestral musician for 40 years so I'm well-versed in music theory and notation.

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    • Marc
    • Marc
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    This is just one suggestion but I think the most important thing is that you discover what makes practicing fun for you.  If that is working on pieces, then you might try inventing exercises based on the hard passages you encounter along the way.  That is not to say that I am discounting the value of basic technical exercises.  It is just that you might need to put them aside for a while until they interest you again.  Just my two cents.  Good luck.  Marc

    Like 3
    • David
    • David.39
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    I鈥檓 in a similar position. One recommendation I received was to start with working through some of the Two-week intensive courses and structuring my practice around each topic (in the Public space area on the Forums page). A more formal recommendation based on TB courses included the following: 

    I recommend the following courses for you:

    Like 1
    • David Great sources. Thanks!

      Like 2
    • Moyses Lopes
    • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
    • Moses
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi, Erik! Maybe in the group Carlevaro's School of Guitar you can find some good practices to maintain your technique. The link is https://guitar-community.tonebase.co/category/carlevaros-school-of-guitar-group. Glad to read you!

    Like 1
    • Stefano
    • Stefano.2
    • 9 mths ago
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    No longer being a youngster, as the 40 years in orchestra would lead one to believe, and imagining that guitar is a hobby, I agree with Marc (and his practical suggestion) that the main thing is to have fun playing.

    In any case, perhaps you can consider this book of practice routines by Simon Powis (of Classical Guitar Corner): https://www.amazon.com/Practice-Routines-Classical-Guitar-progression/dp/1727138325/

    Like 1
    • David
    • David.39
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    As an older adult, I value my time more than ever, and want to spend it wisely at the guitar. Whether the endeavor is described as recreational, or as serving some professional aims, I am old enough that my enjoyment at the instrument comes not only from the sound it produces, but from working towards abstract goals that I achieve through mindful practice.

     

    Upon realizing this, my time with the instrument has become fulfilling, even when I face the sort of frustration that would otherwise make me put the guitar down. It is the intentional practice that keeps me going. I have come to believe that I should utilize any and all possible intellectual aids available to compensate for the natural aging process.

     

    As a younger person, I could rely on quick learning to make advances in a timely fashion; this would make "practicing" seem more like play than work, because I was making progress so quickly and unconsciously, with my "muscle memory" working in overdrive. Now, I look for utilizing practice methods designed to be as efficient as possible, believing that such work will feed back into my practice of playing what I enjoy listening to, whether or not my old brain makes the timely advances that I was accustomed to when young.

     

    Practicing by design has kept me going despite the frustrations of working with an old mind and body that would otherwise make reaching my goal to play those pieces I love a lost cause. I trust in the pedagogy offered by expert teachers here on ToneBase for the specific pieces they teach, and it has helped me stick with my playing, even when facing frustration.

     

    I am piecing to together a routine from their technical series and lectures that is short enough that my hands are not entirely spent before getting to repertoire. It would be great to have such routines more clearly articulated on ToneBase for the novice, musically-literate adult learning guitar for the first time without the aid of weekly in-person private lessons with great teachers. Of course, this assumes a unified pedagogical philosophy, which may make such a one-size-fits-all approach not align with an underlying mission statement. That being said, there does seem to be some desire for such structure, based on some expert pedagogy, for the novice to get started. Later, new approaches could be better appreciated, as long as the initial pedagogy is sound.

     

    The beginner guitar series that exists mixes learning music with learning the guitar; a refinement that eliminates basic musicianship, and focusses on guitar for the musically-trained but novice guitarist would be excellent. The technical selection could be linked up with specific novice repertoire lessons that employ the warm-up and technical portion of the day's practice (much like the old master texts on guitar technique did in book form).  I believe much of the material already exists in the form of great lessons on specific technical skills, so it may be an organizational task. This would go a long way towards addressing the challenging aspect of selecting the most relevant technical work for specific and appropriate repertoire at the beginning level. Some of the existing technical materials, as suggested by ToneBase, are listed below in another comment and could serve as a starting point for designing a self-directed routine. 

     

    As another reference, here is a link to a website that breaks down, with videos, some technical exercises. One might not necessarily have to purchase the printed (digital/paper) music to be able to implement the exercises; just by watching the video lessons one could begin: 

    https://www.thisisclassicalguitar.com/20-favorite-exercises-for-classical-guitar/ 

     

    It must be a challenge to balance the content to satisfy the needs of experience guitarists on ToneBase with those of novices, and I appreciate the efforts by the instructors and staff to work towards satisfying the diverse needs of students.

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    • David Thanks for the very thoughtful response. I started with the first book from thisisclassicalguitar.com. There's a lot there and it's been helpful but it can also be overwhelming, particularly trying to get through all the major and minor scales. That's what prompted me to come to Tonebase: to reset and get to a place where I just enjoy the journey and not get frustrated.

       

      As a very "mindful" practitioner, I enjoy slow deliberate practice, and I have to remember that I'm doing this just to enjoy playing, not to become a solo performer.

      Like 1
  • Hi I am not a new player. At an late intermediate early advanced player. I find that there is so much stuff to do. I get overwhelmed and  time is important when one is 80 y/o. A sort overview practice would be welcomed.  I try to dived it all into sections and divide the week up.  This still does not allow a lot of time to learn pieces. I try to find pieces that have things that I am practicing. For example slurs or scales parts, positions parts, and so on.  This routine guide would be helpful. 

    Like 1
      • Jes煤s Mostajo
      • Computer Engineer and enthusiastic guitarist
      • Jesus_Mostajo
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      peter hancock Hi Peter, I use two or three pages with exercises and warming-up, it is a mix collected from several books, videos and own production. It takes 30 minutes to play.

      If you are interested, I can send it to you privately (for copyright reasons of the sources).

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      • David
      • David.39
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Jes煤s Mostajo I would also be grateful for your material in you warmup technical practice. Like Peter, I feel that I would benefit from something to help me be more efficient with the time spent.

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