Carlevaro - Compositions

This discussion thread is dedicated to Carlevaro's compositions aspect of his work.

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    • Wainull
    • Wai_Ng
    • 1 yr ago
    • Reported - view

    Microestudios No.15

    It's clear that this particular practice is aimed at refining your slur technique. At first, I found myself making a lot of string noises when playing slurs with horizontal shifts. However, after practicing for about a week, I was able to reduce most of the noise, although not completely. I've found that playing fast with horizontal shifts can be quite challenging when it comes to eliminating string noises.😅 

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Dale Needles Dale, thank you so much. At first, I thought that as the studies became more difficult, I would become less motivated. However, that turned out not to be the case. I found myself enjoying No.11-15 even more than the first 10 studies (although I would also like to review the first 10 in the future). I couldn't have made it this far without your guidance and feedback. Your generosity in sharing your knowledge on Tonebase is truly appreciated. Thank you very much! 🙇‍♂️

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    • Wai You are most welcomed.  It has been a great pleasure to watch you progress through these Microestudios and to watch you become acquainted with Maestro Carlevaro, the composer.  

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      • Moyses Lopes
      • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
      • Moses
      • 11 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Wai Great, Wai! Excellent work, looks great. As Blaise said, your control is progressing at each recording. Maybe this strategy of Dale with a whip really works! 😄

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  • Since the Carlevaro forum has been a little quiet lately, I thought it would be a good time to post a couple of Carlearo's early compositions to show the contrast between his modern use of tonality in his more mature works with his more lyrical folkloric pieces he generally wrote for his students.  These two compositions date back to the early 1960s.  The first is entitled Candombe (an Afra-Latino rhythm popular in Uruguay during Carnivale) and written under the pseudonym Vincente Vallegos.  The second is entitled Milongueando written under his own name and is based on the milongo rhythm famous in the Rio de la Plata region.

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    • Dale Needles as beautiful as when you shared them first 🙏

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  • Here is the complete Introduccion y Capricho by Abel Carlevaro. This piece was published in 1983 by Chanterelle Publishers.  I originally studied this piece with Carlevaro in Montevideo when it was first published.  However, I had not played it since then until recently when I began working on it several months ago.  While my recording is by no means perfect (there are several areas I still want to work on), I was relatively pleased with it since this piece was a challenge technically for me as well as playing the full seven minutes by memory with no edits. What I like about this piece is Carlevaro's tonal language and his use of harmonic dissonance.  Definitely one of Carlevaro's more mature compositions.  

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    • Dale Needles that was beautiful Dale, your mastery of Carlevaro's language and technique is stunning, his music shines in your hands my friend! Bravo! 👌💪

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    • Blaise Laflamme Thanks, Blaise.  That means a lot coming from you! Still needs a little work, but it should improve and mature over time.  

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      • Moyses Lopes
      • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
      • Moses
      • 10 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Dale Needlesit sounds Bravissimo, Dale! I echo Blaise's words! This piece sounds great in your hands, the contrasts, the phrasing, everything is working well! I'm sure you think it could be better, it always can, but it's sounding incredible. For me, it's an entirely new piece, I have never heard before. Thanks for sharing!

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    • Moyses Lopes Thanks, Moyses. As I said in response to Blaise, your support means a lot to me.  Hope you are doing well, and we miss you around Tonebase.  Hope to hear some pieces from you soon.  

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  • Here is the first movement of Carlevaro's guitar sonata, Cronomias.  This is a work in progress that I started as part of the "Monsters of Nylon" challenge.  I plan to continue working on this after my two-month trip to the UK and Ireland and hope to add the other two movements in 2024.  

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    • Dale Needles It surely belongs here, bravo again Dale! 💪

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      • Moyses Lopes
      • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
      • Moses
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Dale Needles Great, Dale! I don't know why I lost this post, I saw it just today when I posted my video. Thank you for sharing, it's a beautiful and complex piece, and you got a great result. Looking forward to hearing the other two movements! Bravo!

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    • Moyses Lopes
    • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
    • Moses
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi, friends! I want to share with you my recording of Carlevaro's Microestudio 3. The score has annotations from Maestro, which is at Carlevaro's Library of Alfredo Escande (https://bibliotecaabelcarlevaro.blogspot.com/). Best regards!

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    • Moyses Lopes Bravo!  That was excellent and great to follow along with Carlevaro's annotated score. 

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    • Moyses Lopes Great Moyses, I'm happy to see you back here!

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      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Moyses Lopes It's a perfect rendition of No.3, Moyses! Your sound was so full and powerful that really brought out the contrast of those harmonies, really  Do you have any plans to record more studies in the future?

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      • Moyses Lopes
      • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
      • Moses
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Wai Thank you, Wai! I saw your post where you say are working with Microestudios 11 to 20. So, I was thinking of recording from 1 to 10. If you have another proposal, be my guest! 

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      • ken
      • ken
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Moyses Lopes  Tempo markings in parenthesis are EDITOR markings, Not from the composer.
      People play Villa-Lobos Choros too fast because of this. 

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    • Wainull
    • Wai_Ng
    • 9 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Microestudios No.16

    Hi everyone, I would also like to share my latest recording of Microestudios, this time is No.16. As I progress through the series, I've noticed that after no.16, the difficulty is becoming higher and higher, hope that I will still be able to finish the whole journey of Microestudios. 😅

    Like 2
      • Moyses Lopes
      • Classical Guitarist and Electroacoustic Interpreter
      • Moses
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Wai Bravo, Wai! Excellent performance, for me this piece is "under the fingers" as I usually say! 🙂  No doubt you will soon (and easily) record the #20. Regards!

      Like 1
      • Wainull
      • Wai_Ng
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Moyses Lopes Thank you, Moyses!

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    • Wai great Wai, you're near to have completed the whole set and this flows very well under your finger. 💪 You inspire me, I'll probably record a few of them before starting on the preludios.

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    • Wai Excellent, Wai. That was very well done technically and also very musical. Now on to #17, one of my favorites.  

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  • Been a bit quiet on the Carlevaro Forum lately so I thought it would be good to post another one of Carlevaro's masterful estudios.  Here is Estudio No. 3 (Bicordes) which was published in the early 1980s and was first performed by Carlevaro in 1983 in San Francisco.  Estudio No. 3 is from a set of five estudios which Carlevaro wrote in homage to Villa-Lobos.  I posted this earlier as part of the Year-End Challenge but thought it would be good to post here as well.  I love both the technical challenge of this estudio as well as Carlevaro's use of bi-chordal progressions and harmonic dissonance.  It is definitely a work-out for left-hand!

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